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Lens flares

1095

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Hello all! I am new to lasers and this forum.

I was curious if anyone could shed some insight on something I have noticed.

I made a handheld with a 1W 445nm diode and another with 200mw 650nm. Both are in Aixiz housings with glass lenses.

When I video the blue/ violet one the footage reveals a prominent vertical line lens flare (or is it diffraction spike?).

The red reveals flower shaped/ pixelated hexagon sort of artifacts.

I guess my questions are, "do lens flares differ by wavelength?" And if so what other colors produce what other artifacts?

Thanks!
 
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1095

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I wanted to thank the community for the flurry of responses.

Really? Not even someone calling me a dumbass? Thanks
 

qumefox

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lol.

It doesn't really have much to do with your lenses. More to do with the sensitivity of the sensor in your camera to the different wavelengths.
 
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The vertical line you are referring to is likely not a lens flare. It is caused by electrons "spilling" over from one pixel to adjacent vertical pixels. This is common in CCD cameras. The larger the sensor size, the smaller the spill. The flower / hexagon shape you see with your red is likely bokeh due to the shape of your cameras aperture.

The 1W 445nm causes the spilling while the 650nm does not because the 1W 445nm is much more luminous. The 1W 445nm probably also causes bokeh, but the contrast due to the extreme luminosity negates it. The intensity of such effects may vary with wavelength due to the non-linearity of your cameras sensor, but the same effects should exist for all wavelengths.
 
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1095

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thanks for the responses!

Even the really funny guy doing my bidding and calling me a dumbass!

So have I photographed a diffraction spike like squinting while looking at a star or auto headlight? Is that the "spilling of electrons" referred to?

I have also photographed two other lasers (405nm <5mw and 532nm <5mw) and both of those appear to be of equal brightness in photos as the 1W. They are much less powerful and do not exhibit any odd anomalies on camera.

laser_freak, are you saying those anomalies are based on intensity not wavelength? I know I have a real basic camera, but I have not seen similar anomalies in other people's videos, but an explanation nonetheless. And I have used two different cameras in still and video modes. Both cameras show similar results.

I do understand that an equal power 532nm seems brighter to the human eye than other wavelengths, and so on, but with a fixed (not auto) focus what does bokeh have to do with it?

Do you think a 1W 532nm or 650nm or other would look similar with my cameras?

As far as sensitivity to different wavelengths in the camera, I might need to clarify, that was the original question. Without knowing what to call the phenomenon I was witnessing, I posited a question to the people I thought could help answer my questions. (i.e. this forum)

My cameras can capture ir from leds as well as filtered output from a 532nm pointer, and take great pics and video in daylight. I have taken quality photos and video of candles, aquariums...
...inside as well as outside with natural and artificial light.

Can anyone then suggest an affordable (I know it is relative) camera that can accurately capture video or pics of the 1W 445nm? Or do I resign to deal with the "spill of electrons".

I really do thank those that reply!

I do not view these lasers without proper eye protection so pics and video are to catalog my experiments, and results, both expected and unexpected.

If I/ we cannot see what actually happens when I/ we fire these things what is the point?

my current "quiver" = 650nm, 532nm, 445nm, 405nm
 
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