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LASORB usage (with 445nm)

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I just stumbled across the LASORB at dr. lava's website: http://hacylon.case.edu/ebay/laser_diode/LASORB.php
It's offered in two different forms, IR/red and 405nm. From the datasheet, it says the 405nm version is designed for operating voltages from 4.5 to 6.5 V. However, I plan on running my 445nm diode around 4.3 V. Will this be a problem? Also, in the datasheet it says that there are two different version of the 445nm LASORB: one with a "Typical surge conduction time = 40 microseconds and one with a "Typical surge conduction time = 4 microseconds"
What's the difference between the two? What is the surge conduction time?
Which one is dr. lava selling?

Finally, does anyone have any opinions with a lasorb? Have people been using it in their 445nm builds?
Oh, and yes I did search the forums prior to posting this, but I wanted specific opinions about using it with a 445nm diode.
 

ndrew2505

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lasorbs are for scanner setups.. unless your building a scanner i wouldnt bother. if im not mistaken the lasorb catches any "spikes" that make it through the driver and smooth them out so the diode can handle it.
 
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lasorbs are for scanner setups.. unless your building a scanner i wouldnt bother. if im not mistaken the lasorb catches any "spikes" that make it through the driver and smooth them out so the diode can handle it.
It's prevents ESD from damaging the diode. Can ESD affect portable (handheld) lasers? Wouldn't the host needed to be grounded in order for ESD to affect it?
 

Tabish

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Can't you just smooth out the voltage spikes with a simple cap on the output ?
 

plexus

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a friend of mine who is incredibly knowledgeable with electronics (he's a freelance robotics control system engineer) is also a laser hobbyist. he has been assembling laser pointers for awhile now. he's killed a couple LDs along the way with ESD although he employs good ESD practices. sometimes it just happens and LDs are very sensitive to ESD. his best practice now is to use Lasorbs in all his builds. I have ordered some myself for my 445 and 405 builds that I will be doing shortly. It might not be essential but its probably good practice and for the price, worth it.
 
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I was told by Hayden at Pangolin that the lasorbs for 405nm will work perfectly with 445nm diodes. The 445nm lasorbs are not in stock yet..

Go on youtube and watch some of the videos of the lasorb in action.. it's amazing.
 

Morgan

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From what I understand, scanners are more susceptible to spikes as they use step down transformers and other PSU electronics to convert from mains power which in itself can carry transients. Once built, it's unlikely to crop up in handhelds. Most diodes killed from ESD die during extraction and a Lasorb won't help if it's waiting to be hooked up!

I've also heard that people are using the 405nm Lasorbs. I still think these 445s are hardier than most but how they handle ESD, I do not know. I do know you can hook them up in reverse polarity to a Microboost set close to 1A and still come out the other end with a fully functional blue!

M
:)
 

Meatball

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Its for scanner setups.. so is it supposed to protect against spikes from the features of a scanner that fluctuate the diode's current?

I'm just wondering since I'm running two diodes in series off the same LM317, WITH a pot for in-use current adjustment.
 

Morgan

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Now there's a question...

I can only say that the lasorb is there for spikes full stop. How the spikes are produced; their voltage/current/duration I can't say. Probably a question for the manufacturers to be honest. Lasorbs run in parallel with the diode too, so you'd also have to ask them if you'd need one one on each diode or whether one in parallel with both would work. You could also try asking on PL?

In the YouTube vids they zap a non protected diode, (a PHR I think), with a high voltage spark, (Oudin coil?), and kill it stone dead. No surprise there but with the Lasorb in place, it survives. Impressive to say the least.

M
:)
 
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Now there's a question...

I can only say that the lasorb is there for spikes full stop. How the spikes are produced; their voltage/current/duration I can't say. Probably a question for the manufacturers to be honest. Lasorbs run in parallel with the diode too, so you'd also have to ask them if you'd need one one on each diode or whether one in parallel with both would work. You could also try asking on PL?
:)
Lasorbs handle any kind of sharp change in voltage/current and basically just drop their resistance as low as possible to dissipate the energy. They also have a separate diode in them for reverse-polarity, if I recall correctly.

You want the lasorb physically as close as possible to the diode, maybe up to a couple of inches away - so unless the diodes are right on top of each other then it's wise to have one lasorb per diode.
 

LSRFAQ

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I wish their website order page had PRICES...
7-9$ in small quantities, and despite what everybody here says about "scanners only" most laser diode drivers emit spikes at some point. Well worth the peace of mind when using a expensive diode. The 405 diodes are so spike sensitive compared to IR and Red its not even funny.
There are Lasorb group buys from time to time which get the cost down, but in my case, when a dead diode costs me a paying show, its money well spent. If your adopting a switching "Led flashlight" current source for your pointer, you really want the Lasorb for the inductive spikes that can occur.

BTW< Those of us who are Laserists, hate the term "scanners" as used on this forum.. It is a "laser show" or a "projector". Scanners are components used in a "Projector". Laser Show or Laser Display has been the correct term for the past 25 years.

"Scanner dude" is a serious insult to most of us, OK? We don't go around listening to cops on a scanner radio! We're "Laserists" or "Laser Artists", and that term is used both in and out of the industry.

I've done my best to stop saying "pointer dudes" and "burners", so please consider using the industry terms!

Thank you for your support,

Steve
 
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bbshamsa

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7-9$ in small quantities, and despite what everybody here says about "scanners only" most laser diode drivers emit spikes at some point. Well worth the peace of mind when using a expensive diode. The 405 diodes are so spike sensitive compared to IR and Red its not even funny.
There are Lasorb group buys from time to time which get the cost down, but in my case, when a dead diode costs me a paying show, its money well spent. If your adopting a switching "Led flashlight" current source for your pointer, you really want the Lasorb for the inductive spikes that can occur.

BTW< Those of us who are Laserists, hate the term "scanners" as used on this forum.. It is a "laser show" or a "projector". Scanners are components used in a "Projector". Laser Show or Laser Display has been the correct term for the past 25 years.

"Scanner dude" is a serious insult to most of us, OK? We don't go around listening to cops on a scanner radio! We're "Laserists" or "Laser Artists", and that term is used both in and out of the industry.

I've done my best to stop saying "pointer dudes" and "burners", so please consider using the industry terms!

Thank you for your support,

Steve
Makes sense, as when I watched the promo video the main focus was on ESD protection, not spikes. To me it came across as though the spike protection is a given, and they were drawing more attention to ESD. Presumably because there are alternative methods of spike protection, as already mentioned, and ESD protection is rather unique to the Lasorb product. Why focus on factors of parity instead of unique ones?

Also, I've seen some pics of them in use where one is soldered directly to the laser diode pins; can't get much closer. Take a look at the PL forum, where one guy built a couple of 445 modules from scratch, and they are truly amazing examples of ground-up builds.

I'm getting a couple for sure, just makes sense at the price. One extra durability feature.

Besides, can't ESD potentially effect a fully assembled hand-held anyway? I mean, for example, static charge build-up, then taking hold of it?
 

LSRFAQ

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Besides, can't ESD potentially effect a fully assembled hand-held anyway? I mean, for example, static charge build-up, then taking hold of it?[/QUOTE]
end quote:

This depends on the construction, if it can find a gap to crawl into or a weak spot in the plastic, or a route in around the button, or when changing the batteries, why yes.

For the most part it is when building or working on the pointer, but under some cases, such as when certain poorly built drivers are starting up, or shutting down, that it can protect as well.

I'm looking at a project next week with a 1 Watt 550$ single emitter red diode, so you can bet the first thing that happens is it gets a Lasorb.

Steve
 




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