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Laserbee LPM help

Razako

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Unfortunately I got a little hotmelt clue on the sensor of my LPM and it pulled the black paint off the sensor. No other damage was done. Can I just put more generic black spray paint on the sensor, or does it need to be some special type?
 

diachi

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Unfortunately I got a little hotmelt clue on the sensor of my LPM and it pulled the black paint off the sensor. No other damage was done. Can I just put more generic black spray paint on the sensor, or does it need to be some special type?

Not sure exactly what paint the LaserBee uses, some folk here have used high temperature matte black paint to coat their DIY sensors. If the paint you use is too different from the original you'd need to re-calibrate the meter though as the absorption would be different.
 

ElectricPlasma

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Yea I would make sure to use heat resistant paint (make sure it's matte), normal paint would most likely just burn off when in use.

I have to ask though, how did you get hot glue on your sensor?
 
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paul1598419

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Don't do it, Razako. I made that same mistake with my Laserbee and it not only didn't work, but the paint thinners got into the connections and screwed the whole thing up. I talked to Laserbee about it and they, of course, told me i had to send it to them at a fairly high fee to recoat and calibrate. If any part of the surface remains, I'd just use that before using paint on it.

Edit: before it went south, it did work, but the calibration was way off. So, if you do this, you most likely won't have an LPM that is usable.
 
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ElectricPlasma

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Don't do it, Razako. I made that same mistake with my Laserbee and it not only didn't work, but the paint thinners got into the connections and screwed the whole thing up. I talked to Laserbee about it and they, of course, told me i had to send it to them at a fairly high fee to recoat and calibrate. If any part of the surface remains, I'd just use that before using paint on it.
How did it not work? It should be fine as the sensor is only temperature sensative right? Maybe a bit of recalibration yes, but I'm curious what happened to yours.
 

paul1598419

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Initially the calibration was way off. I stopped using it as I had other options at that time. Then about six months ago it quit altogether. The only thing that had changed during this time was the paint used on the sensor, which I assume probably stripped away insulation and caused it to short.
 
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I recently bought a laserbee 5W PM and damaged the sensor myself. There's a special coating on them.. Almost like chalk dust or something. That's obviously the coating they talk about. Personally I wouldn't spray it. I'd bite the bullet and just have it re coated and recalibrate day the same time. Mine still seems to be reading fine but really wish I didn't knock some of that coating off 😔
 

Razako

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Don't do it, Razako. I made that same mistake with my Laserbee and it not only didn't work, but the paint thinners got into the connections and screwed the whole thing up. I talked to Laserbee about it and they, of course, told me i had to send it to them at a fairly high fee to recoat and calibrate. If any part of the surface remains, I'd just use that before using paint on it.

Edit: before it went south, it did work, but the calibration was way off. So, if you do this, you most likely won't have an LPM that is usable.
Thanks for the info. I think I'll just leave it alone and use the remaining painted surface. The meter is still usable and works alright, as only a small part of the surface was damaged.

As for how I got the hotmelt on the sensor, that's a pretty weird story. I was trying to just stick the bottom of the heatsink to an object to take a measurement, but somehow the glue gun had a little line drizzle out onto the sensor. Pulling the glue off took the sensor coating with it.
 
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