Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser safety goggles ok for Solar Eclipse ?

burner

New member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
110
Points
0
Hi everyone, was curious to see what pair of laser safety goggles (if any) would be good enough to watch the solar eclipse this Sunday ?? Any help would be great. I saw somewhere that a welders mask would work but i dont have one. Thanks.

edited for my mistake =)
 
Last edited:



jcranmer

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
2,111
Points
63
Re: Laser safety goggles ok for Lunar Eclipse ?

If it were actually a lunar eclipse you wouldn't need protection.

The event in question is a solar eclipse and no I don't believe laser googles would provide you protection. They are designed for a very narrow bandwidth of light, not the entire spectrum.
 

ShortyInCanada

New member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
617
Points
0
Plain and simple : NO !
The full spectrum light from the sun is not "filtered" to any apreciable extent by a narrow band lens even IF you had the proper OD rating.
All the rest of the light not filtered out would cook your eyes.
And even if you were in the extremely narrow path of the total eclipse the type of eclipse this time is not actually total.
Due to the changing distance of the Moon in it's orbit around the Earth this eclipse will be slightly less than complete blockage of the sun. A thin ring of completely full powered radiation from the Sun will be visible provided you use the proper veiwing methods.
For most of the inhabitants of the Earth in the rest of the partial eclipse zones the overall brightness of the sun diminishing is probably all you will notice.
Remember that the Sun produces ALL bands of radiation. Not just visible light. UV, IR, and the whole spectrum will be blasting away at whatever is pointing that way.
Be SMART and use proper safety methods.
You only get one pair of eyes and you want them to still be working as much as possible when you turn 80. (And I guarantee they won't be anything near as good as they are now.)
:tsk:
 

Blord

New member
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
5,361
Points
0
The safest way to watch is solar projection. You are not watching to the sun directly but you project it on a plain board. Another advantage is that multiple people can watch simultaneously the solar eclips. Do-it-yourself Sunspot Watching

NEVER WATCH THE SUN DIRECTLY !!
 

Shakenawake

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
1,805
Points
83
I was wondering about this too. What range of wavelengths needs to be guarded against? I thought I remembered reading somewhere that staring at the sun was like having a 30mW laser shone into your eye. If this is true, wouldn't OD4 glasses be sufficient, assuming they blocked the relevant range of wavelengths? One pair I have blocks IIRC, 180nm to 540nm, and they block IR light from I think 800nm to 2000nm. I have another pair that blocks the red part, have to check where it starts. If I combined them, would it just be better than nothing but ultimately still a bad idea?
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
16,636
Points
113
It's a terrible idea. Laser googles were never made with the power of the sun in mind. They make cheap mylar paper glasses that will protect you. You can't even look at the total eclipse without this kind of protection. I have heard that the highest protective arc welding helmet will work, but only that. Otherwise, use the pin hole in a box trick to shine an image across the box that you can look at.
 
Last edited:

lasersbee

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
17,651
Points
113
I was wondering about this too. What range of wavelengths needs to be guarded against? I thought I remembered reading somewhere that staring at the sun was like having a 30mW laser shone into your eye. If this is true, wouldn't OD4 glasses be sufficient, assuming they blocked the relevant range of wavelengths? One pair I have blocks IIRC, 180nm to 540nm, and they block IR light from I think 800nm to 2000nm. I have another pair that blocks the red part, have to check where it starts. If I combined them, would it just be better than nothing but ultimately still a bad idea?
1) Are you aware that his Thread is 5 years old :thinking:
2) Are you aware that the sun outputs the total
visible light spectrum...
That is what you need protection from....

Google is a great place to get Technical data/info
on the dangers of looking into the Sun without
proper eye protection...


Jerrry
 

Shakenawake

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
1,805
Points
83
Yes I know the sun emits the entire spectrum, that's why I asked what range needs to be guarded against. Does the atmosphere not block most of the UV? The thread may be old, I honestly didn't look. Thought it was new based on the fact an eclipse is imminent. With both pairs on, it is hard to see anything.
 

lasersbee

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
17,651
Points
113
N/P...
Hey... they are your eyes....
You can do whatever you want with/to them.
I'm using my Welder's Helmet to see the Eclipse
if the clouds ever leave. I really like my eyes...:yh:

Jerry
 

Accutronitis

Banned
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
1,414
Points
0
N/P...
Hey... they are your eyes....
You can do whatever you want with/to them.
I'm using my Welder's Helmet to see the Eclipse
if the clouds ever leave. I really like my eyes...:yh:

Jerry
What shade are they ? Shades 10 or 11 are no good !

You should only use a 12 or higher (darker) to be safe....
 
Last edited:

lasersbee

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
17,651
Points
113
What shade are they ? Shades 10 or 11 are no good !

You should only use a 12 or higher (darker) to be safe....
I had bought a #14 filter for my Welding Helmet
in anticipation of the eclipse...

Jerry
 




Top