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Hi and thanks for taking the time to read- I have been a 'good boy' and did all I could to both read the FAQ's here and do a search for any and all threads relating to safety but the 2+ hours I have invested in researching have yielded few answers.

I appreciate the opportunity to post on your message board and apologize if this thread is one of those annoying '20 people ask this question a month' threads.

So I implore anyone with scientifically grounded data to help me be safe with a 200mW green laser, probably IR unfiltered laser. The agreement I have with 'Rayfoss' for the purchase of the laser should include their goggles but I am skeptical of how much protection they will afford.

Please help me understand what is and is not dangerous using a 200mw green laser.

I've read as long as the dot is on a carpet, wall, or other relatively diffuse surface no danger exists either through the green or IR light.

At what distance will a diffuse viewing of the 'dot' prove damaging, on average? Is this damage permanent? At what distance will it be OK to view a highly reflected beam from a 200mW green pointer?

*most importantly* are there goggles that protect against both IR and green? Are there any goggles that protect against *all* wavelengths including IR?

If anyone has any info or a link for me that points to a really GOOD DEAL on eye protection as per above PLEASE help me to locate!

I have always enjoyed experimenting in the realm of biology and physics - have found lots of great deals over the years (like for example I was lucky enough to pick up a $7000+ stereo microscope- Nikon Smz-2T- for $500) but this latest fascination with lasers has me a little nervous.

Thanks again for the pros here to take the time to read, and thanks in advance for taking the time to respond!
 

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At what distance will it be OK to view a highly reflected beam from a 200mW green pointer?

definitely none!
its better not to view lasers of these high powers indoors at all without glasses, even from a long distance. walls etc are a lot more reflective then u would think. the goggles u get would not protect against IR, but some can be bought that would- try dragonlasers or oemlasers

there is a website for calculating the safe viewing distance from a laser dot on a surface of certain reflectivity but i cannot remember the site- maybe someone else can and post it?
 
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It appears that there are no goggles that will filter both IR and green at the same time- if someone can offer a suggestion here it would be appreciated!
 

Folder

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You can get OD5+ goggles that protect against green laser beams on focalprice for about $7. These won't filter IR but there generally isn't *that* much IR run off so it'll be fine unless you look directly into the beam, which would be stupid.
 

Things

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Don't worry about IR blocking googles. The IR light will be last of your worries when dealing with that much green light. It diverges much faster than the green light, as the focal point for 808 and 1064nm light is much further forward than 532nm. The only time the IR could be a problem is if you try look directly into the laser, which is stupid whether you have protection or not.

If the laser actually does 200mW, it'll be too bright to look at comfortably on a white wall, or really close up, for for shining around the room and "star pointing" it'll be fine without protection. Do watch out for reflective objects in your room, however.

Cheers
Dan
 
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I have been reading the threads here for 3 days and yet even I can say with conviction I am all stocked up for life on the "your eyes aren't worth X dollars" comments... perhaps the better way to put it is that it's not worth the cost of the laser+$200 glasses to experiment with the laser. I don't know how much I will really learn anyway, and no, $200 safety goggles are a waste of money for someone that only wants to do a few experiments using a laser- if that's what it takes to be safe I would rather - as I wrote- not purchase the laser. I never wrote that my eyes aren't worth the cost of the goggles, I wrote the laser isn't worth purchasing if I need those goggles.

Folder and others, are you folks confident these very inexpensive goggles will protect against the brightness of the dot at a foot or two away ( burning experiment) or is this more like protection for a few YARDS away as in dot on the wall, reflection, etc.?

Have you folks that have been around a while read threads about members here suffering eye damage from lasers?
 
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lasersbee

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Hi and thanks for taking the time to read- I have been a 'good boy' and did all I could to both read the FAQ's here and do a search for any and all threads relating to safety but the 2+ hours I have invested in researching have yielded few answers.

I appreciate the opportunity to post on your message board and apologize if this thread is one of those annoying '20 people ask this question a month' threads.

So I implore anyone with scientifically grounded data to help me be safe with a 200mW green laser, probably IR unfiltered laser. The agreement I have with 'Rayfoss' for the purchase of the laser should include their goggles but I am skeptical of how much protection they will afford.

Please help me understand what is and is not dangerous using a 200mw green laser.

I've read as long as the dot is on a carpet, wall, or other relatively diffuse surface no danger exists either through the green or IR light.

At what distance will a diffuse viewing of the 'dot' prove damaging, on average? Is this damage permanent? At what distance will it be OK to view a highly reflected beam from a 200mW green pointer?

*most importantly* are there goggles that protect against both IR and green? Are there any goggles that protect against *all* wavelengths including IR?

If anyone has any info or a link for me that points to a really GOOD DEAL on eye protection as per above PLEASE help me to locate!

I have always enjoyed experimenting in the realm of biology and physics - have found lots of great deals over the years (like for example I was lucky enough to pick up a $7000+ stereo microscope- Nikon Smz-2T- for $500) but this latest fascination with lasers has me a little nervous.

Thanks again for the pros here to take the time to read, and thanks in advance for taking the time to respond!
Here is an interesting read on DPSS Green Lasers that was
posted by LSRFAQ...

http://www.nist.gov/customcf/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=906138

It made me think twice about invisible Laser danger... and how
to easily test your 532nm Laser for it..


Jerry
 

DJNY

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WOW - thanks for all the info- I really can't afford a pair of $100 glasses... I think I am going to just stick the pointer in a drawer when I get it. Sorry guys but from many of the responses I've seen on this board to various threads, the 150mW unfiltered unit that I was able to purchase - like any young kid could have- through Paypal is just plain irresponsible to sell. I'm not suggesting the majority are foolish, but I shudder to think of all the people that purchase one after a simple web search and don't even know about this message board.
The manufacturer said they were going to throw in a free pair of safety glasses (at least that was my impression) but I still don't think I want to support the manufacture of pointers that don't even have IR filters.
Thanks again!
 

qumefox

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I'm kind of confused that none of the replies in this thread mention either just buying a IR filtered laser, or simply adding an IR filter ($3 plus a little glue/epoxy) to a non-filtered one... If you keep the IR from leaving the laser, that sort of eliminates the need for goggles that protect against it, correct?
 
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Great point, I wasn't sure if it was that easy- can anyone recommend an IR filter?
Also, I didn't mean any disrespect to anyone, I'm just shocked at the ease at which one can inadvertently harm themselves, others, or their pet cats chasing laser dots. You would think that for the price of this IR filter you mention that manufacturers would feel some sort of moral responsibility to include them. Does it affect the brightness/visibility/burning ability of the beam perhaps?
 




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