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Laser build for reprap 3D printer

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Hi all,

After wandering a while over the internet to find a laser to modify a 3d printer, I finally arrived on this forum.

As I just told, I try to add a laser engraver/cutter to my prusa I3 3d printer.

I need to control it with a 12v signal (that is the voltage sent by the board).

All I have found on the internet are ttl blue lasers that only accept 5v max for the signal.

I have benn thinking about adding a voltage regulator to reduce the signal as a LM7805, but I don't even know if it would work.

The other solution would be to build my own driver, but I don't really have the knowledge to do so.

If someone had any comments/ideas and advice for a cheap but reliable solution, it would be great.

Thanks in advance
 

ElectricPlasma

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Hi all,

After wandering a while over the internet to find a laser to modify a 3d printer, I finally arrived on this forum.

As I just told, I try to add a laser engraver/cutter to my prusa I3 3d printer.

I need to control it with a 12v signal (that is the voltage sent by the board).

All I have found on the internet are ttl blue lasers that only accept 5v max for the signal.

I have benn thinking about adding a voltage regulator to reduce the signal as a LM7805, but I don't even know if it would work.

The other solution would be to build my own driver, but I don't really have the knowledge to do so.

If someone had any comments/ideas and advice for a cheap but reliable solution, it would be great.

Thanks in advance
Very interesting idea, adding a laser engraver to a 3D printer, making it kinda like a "2-in-1" 3D printer/engraver :p

A voltage regulator would work to power a lower voltage laser module, a higher powered red module would work for engraving, but just remember you'll have to re-focus the module every time you change the distance between the laser and the target.

As for powering straight off of 12v, you could probably try finding a labby module and go straight off 12v, but you would need to keep down the heat with a heat sink of some sort, but you'll also have to do so if you use a lower voltage module.
 

diachi

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Very interesting idea, adding a laser engraver to a 3D printer, making it kinda like a "2-in-1" 3D printer/engraver :p

A voltage regulator would work to power a lower voltage laser module, a higher powered red module would work for engraving, but just remember you'll have to re-focus the module every time you change the distance between the laser and the target.

As for powering straight off of 12v, you could probably try finding a labby module and go straight off 12v, but you would need to keep down the heat with a heat sink of some sort, but you'll also have to do so if you use a lower voltage module.

OP is talking about reducing the signal voltage for modulation I believe.

OP - Something as simple as this would do for a digital signal: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipper_(electronics)

A simple voltage divider should also work. Can be made with a single potentiometer.

If you want to get complicated you could use an Op-Amp with a gain of <1 (Technically an attenuator then, not an amplifier!).
 

diachi

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Thanks for your answer.

In fact the laser is 12v powered, but the signal to activate it through the driver must be 5v as on this one for example :
Online Shop REAL 2000mw/2w 445nm 450nm Focusable blue Laser Module diode High Power laser Engraving TT L DIY CNC Adjust Free glasses|Aliexpress Mobile

The problem is that the signalast from the printer board is 12v and will fry the driver.
Yeah, that's what I thought you meant. Options presented in my post should all be viable.

To be fair - a quality built driver should have something built in to clip signal voltages that are too high and prevent damage.
 
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Ok, thanks. I'll start looking at it.
My electronic knowledge is basic ++ if I can say.
I will need to check what the signal looks like on the printer output. Luckily I was given a oscilloscope a few weeks ago! :)
 




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