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Is it myth,rumor?

FatalaS

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Well I've heard that red lasers burn better than any other laser that's visible.Is that true?
 

FatalaS

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I have more questions,

Why?Why blu ray has the most burning power per mw?

And which laser will harm you more IF it goes into your eye? 5mW 532nm green or blu ray one(red)?Since green is most visible it should harm eye more?Or since red or blu ray ones will harm one since they can burn eye better?

Some people in that thread says

"The color of the laser really doesn't matter for burning ability. It is the focus of the light, the "steadiness" of your hand, and the material that is being burned that is more important in burning."

and some

"blu ray has the most burning power per mw. "


It's hard to choose which to believe.
 

AlexStyl

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Technically the lower the wavelength, the more energy density, so it should burn better for the same power output... In theory a 100mW bluray is stronger than a 100mW red, though in reality there isn't much difference. For the most part output power means a lot more about burning capability than anything else. 100mW = 100mW regardless of color.
Another thing is different colored objects absorb different colors of light. A red object for example absorbs every color except for red, since it reflects red light, it appears to our eyes as red. For red objects, a red laser will not be able to burn them very well, since most of the light is reflected away, not absorbed by the object. Black objects absorb all colors, so all colored lasers will burn black objects just as effectively. White objects reflect all colors, so no lasers will be able to burn them very well, although bluray seems to be absorbed, so bluray is better at burning white objects than other colors.

As far as visibility goes, the human eye sees green much brighter than any other color, so green lasers will look much brighter at lower powers. Bluray is on the very verge of being invisible to the human eye, so even very high powered blurays aren't very visible.

From the post of pseudolobster at the thread http://laserpointerforums.com/f44/what-best-color-burning-capability-40947.html
Not sure if everything is right though
 
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EpicHam

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I have more questions,

Why?Why blu ray has the most burning power per mw?

And which laser will harm you more IF it goes into your eye? 5mW 532nm green or blu ray one(red)?Since green is most visible it should harm eye more?Or since red or blu ray ones will harm one since they can burn eye better?

Some people in that thread says

"The color of the laser really doesn't matter for burning ability. It is the focus of the light, the "steadiness" of your hand, and the material that is being burned that is more important in burning."

and some

"blu ray has the most burning power per mw. "


It's hard to choose which to believe.
Scientifically speaking when we disregard all the engineering details.
In a controlled environment , by the first quantization of the quantum theory.
E=hf = (hc)/(wavelength)
Where h is the planck constant and f is the frequency of the wave.
So the lower the wavelength or inversely , higher the frequency of the wave, the higher the energy of the photons.

Though that is true .
In real life, the burning power largely is responsible by the construction of the diode and the absorption spectrum of the material to be burnt.
Single diode lasers (such as those of low power red lasers) are better at burning ,since they have better divergence, meaning the energy is better concentrated.
Thus, at the same power level , a single mode laser when compared with a multimode. Will ALWAYS burn better.

As for the absorption spectrum , there are far too many variables to say.
However, generally speaking, materials usually tend to absorb UV better.
 




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