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Infrared Lasers - The Practical Differences

jaden1010

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Hi,

Could someone please explain the practical differences between these wave lengths of lasers 980 nm, 808nm, 1064, 1342 nm? I understand the light scale, but what practical differences might there be in their applications?

*Also what is the purpose of laser pulses besides measurement applications, like TTL and KHZ. Does pulsing the laser do anything to your target, or give you slightly more power, or generate a frequency that could effect your target or whatever you are pointing the laser at?

Thanks,
-Jaden
 
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Seoul_lasers

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Hi,

Could someone please explain the practical differences between these wave lengths of lasers 980 nm, 808nm, 1064, 1342 nm? I understand the light scale, but what practical differences might there be in their applications?

*Also what is the purpose of laser pulses besides measurement applications, like TTL and KHZ. Does pulsing the laser do anything to your target, or give you slightly more power, or generate a frequency that could effect your target or whatever you are pointing the laser at?

Thanks,
-Jaden
Just about all the large IR (808nm esp.) multi-mode diode bars are
not quick pulsed, but rather slowly elevated to their working current.
808nm is common for CNC now for organic material like wood. There are some 808nm diode arrays that are capable of cutting metals but require large cooling chillers, temperature monitoring and so on...
If you want a multipurpose engraver I'd suggest going CO2 as the longer wavelength is absorbed by nearly everything including many reflective metals and surfaces including glass. A cheap CO2 laser tube (400W) is around ~$300-400... correct me if I am wrong.
CO2 is 10.6uM. or Deep IR. :can:
So, longer wavelengths get absorbed by just about every kind of material as it is essentially (heat), thus allowing us to cut more kinds of materials than say shorter
wavelengths.

Please use the search for your other questions...
:thinking::thanks:Does that somewhat answer your question?
 
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