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Infrared Lasers: Do They All Burn?

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BrittanyGulden

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Searched around a bit and can't seem to find the answer. All my "searches" direct me towards is "How To Video's."

I am in need of some type of laser to for my Rifle. Laser will be visualized through some sort of IR or Thermal Screen/Monitor and the laser will be used as my Cross Airs/Reticals.

This will be my "Night Vision Scope"

The military seems to be only using Green. Is there a specific reason behind this?

Also, I have searched around for Laser Distances and can't find them. I only need to reach out 250 yrds but hey why not go farther if I can.

Is there a section on this forum where it shows various How To Vids?

I am going to go do some searching! I just wanted to see if all Infrared Lasers "burn?" It'd be nice if they didn't because on my rifle, I wouldn't need a laser to burn anything, I just need it to be infrared so I can see it and other (animals) cant:)

thnks!
 

lasersbee

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IR Lasers or any Wavelength Lasers can burn if focused to
a point and if their power output is high enough.

You can post in any appropriate section on the Forum.

Don't forget to read the FAQs...the Stickies and the
Forum Rules..


Jerry
 
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Searched around a bit and can't seem to find the answer. All my "searches" direct me towards is "How To Video's."

I am in need of some type of laser to for my Rifle. Laser will be visualized through some sort of IR or Thermal Screen/Monitor and the laser will be used as my Cross Airs/Reticals.

This will be my "Night Vision Scope"

The military seems to be only using Green. Is there a specific reason behind this?

Also, I have searched around for Laser Distances and can't find them. I only need to reach out 250 yrds but hey why not go farther if I can.

Is there a section on this forum where it shows various How To Vids?

I am going to go do some searching! I just wanted to see if all Infrared Lasers "burn?" It'd be nice if they didn't because on my rifle, I wouldn't need a laser to burn anything, I just need it to be infrared so I can see it and other (animals) cant:)

thnks!
An IR laser will burn if it's powerful enough, same as any other laser. If you use an IR laser from 5-70mW you don't really have to worry about burning all though it is still very dangerous to the eyes
 

Arayan

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The military seems to be only using Green. Is there a specific reason behind this?
The reason is the brightness to the human eye, green lasers emit light with a wavelength in the green spectral region from 495nm to 570nm. The typical wavelength for green lasers is 532nm (emerald green).
The human eye is most sensitive to light with a wavelength of approximately 555nm (yellow/green) which makes green lasers much more visible than red or other lasers.
 

Ablaze

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If you set your IR laser illuminator to a wide focus it will not burn. If it is powerful enough it might feel like sunlight when it shines on you, but you won't need an IR scope that powerful in order to enhance your night vision.

Personally I suggest you get a night vision scope for your gun and attach a widely focused IR laser below the barrel. I believe this will work very well for you.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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If you set your IR laser illuminator to a wide focus it will not burn. If it is powerful enough it might feel like sunlight when it shines on you, but you won't need an IR scope that powerful in order to enhance your night vision.

Personally I suggest you get a night vision scope for your gun and attach a widely focused IR laser below the barrel. I believe this will work very well for you.
Wide Focus? I am strictly using the Laser as my "Cross Airs" or "Reticals" so the smaller the focus, the better.

NIght Vision Scopes are extremely expensive & to me it's more about the learning process. All I need is some sort of Screen/Monitor/lense to serve as a "Viewer" that can pick up IR, In my case IR laser. The screen/monitor/lense needs to have some sort of variable "Zoom" also. I know the newer Lenses on stand still camera's have "Automatic" Zooms: now that would be nice!

Basically, the screen/monitor/lense that I use will be the "Scope" as It will "Zoom" into the target & the IR Laser will be using will serve as my "Cross Airs" or "Reticals."


The issue W/ using the "IR & LED Method" is it DOES NOT amplify. I need an instrument that can amplify & that is called an IIT (image intensifier tube)

See Link: I am in the process of building one!

HowStuffWorks "Image Enhancement"
 

Ablaze

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A mid power IR laser on a wide focus will illuminate everything so that it will be clearly visible on your camera without the need to amplify.

Actually, it would be kind of neat to just attach a wide focus IR laser to a filtered camera to create a flashlight that wouldn't be visible to anyone but you.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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A mid power IR laser on a wide focus will illuminate everything so that it will be clearly visible on your camera without the need to amplify.

Actually, it would be kind of neat to just attach a wide focus IR laser to a filtered camera to create a flashlight that wouldn't be visible to anyone but you.


LOL, you just answerd my next question.

My next question was on the oldschool "IR and LED Method." The problem being its only good for shorter distances as it doesn't amplify. I have seen many people use Laser Diodes W/ a VERY wide Focus as this would "beam" out there a good ways and serve as a great replacement for an IR LED bulb.


On your second paragraph, EXACTLY! That is what I am trying to accomplish:)

Before I go about screwing around Cathodes and making my IIT, I will be using the "cheap method" and heading with a Laser Diode and some type of camera or video cam as my "scope."



Before, when I noted on me using a "Laser." I don't think you fully understood me. I wasn't going to use the Laser as a "light source." I NEEDED to use it as my "Cross Airs" or "Reticals" Meaning I would Aim with my laser dot. I think you may have gotten confused with me trying to use the Laser as more of a light source vs using it as an "Aiming Instrument."


Anyways, so let me get this straight: What would I use as my "view source." A camera Lense or a Video Cam W/ a screen?

I need something with a very good "Zoom" so I assume a camera lense would be cheaper vs finding a video cam with an equivalent zoom for the same price.

Basics: What would I all need from the Video Cam OR Camera Lense?

"Zoom" & IR right? I do not completly understand the whole IR filter yet. So ALL video Cam AND stand still cameras have them. So you need them correct? If so, why is it when you youtube "DIY nightvision" you see video's of people telling you all you have to do is remove the IR filter from your camera to achieve "Night Vision." If I do need the "IR filter" than why not just apply an IR filter at the end of my rifle scope and stick an IR laser above it? The zoom is already built in the scope, the only downfall is reticals won't be as bright as Id like them to be. You can make IR filters using Film, just buy the Film and have it developed right away and bam, an IR filter. You could make IR filter Goggles, apply a laser and you wouldn't even need to tamper with your scope. So, do you need the IR filter or should it be taken out? I guess another downfall of using IR filtered goggles would be you wouldnt be able to see sh*t, lol. I mean, like things close to you that you can see in the "dark light" anways.


Also, I would like to achieve thermal vision. Simpe right, replace IR filter W/ Negative Film/screen and BAM, thermal vision. However, since I am using this instrument as a "scope" I need to have an aiming device of some sort. Would thermal vision be able to pick up an IR laser? I assume it all depends right: I mean, my desired range is 250 yrds. So I would need an IR laser that would "be hott or warm" at 250 yrds allowing my thermal vision to pick up it correct?


Anyways, So I think you understand what I am trying to achieve. I have now, a "viewer" that allows me to view and Zoom & a "light source" which in this case will be an IR laser with a very wide focus. As noted, I am using this instrument as a "SCope" so All that is missing is an "aiming device" otherwise known as "cross airs" or "reticals."

Options? Just use another Laser right? This laser would not serve as a "light source" it will specifically serve as my sights meaning the laser dot will be my "aiming mechanism." Now, I need something W/ a very small focus. This laser ofcourse, will need to be IR & the color "Green" is most sensative to human eyes so I will be using a "Green" Laser Diode. I assume I will also be using a green Laser Diode for my "light source" as noted earlier. I mean, one with a very wide focus to serve only as a "light source."


I think we are on the same page, hmm time to go laser shopping. Suggestions would be awesome!

So these are the questions to be asked:

Type of View Source?

Stand Still Camera Lense OR Video Cam: optical/digital

Type Of Laser For "Light Source?"

Smaller the better! Green ofcourse. Wider the focus the better allowing me to see more area. Need to achieve 250 yrds (greater distance, the better) needs to be IR. NOTE: You think I could achieve "good lighting" with 1 laser? I do have the option of going multipe lasers, but more spendy. Wait a second, just thought of something. Degree! This is baffling me: Stand still Camera VS Video Cam : Will I get the same maximum degree out of both of them? In theory, it seems like a regular stand still camera would only allow me to view 180 degrees, but it seems like a Video Cam would allow me greater, but wait. Can it?

Type Of Laser For "Aiming Instrument?"

Smaller the better! Green Ofcourse. SMALLER the focus, the better. Allow me to see 250 yrds (greater the distance, the better) Needs to be IR




That's it! I still am unware of the Dangers of using Lenses and whether or not they will or can damage my eyes when focused on on a laser dot. I am hoping the paragraph I posted will give you an idea, and hopefully I or someone can recomend me a laser that won't damage my eyes. Afterall, most lasers I see on this forum are "to the mile" I only need several hundred yards....


Sorry for lengthy Post but i think I "noobed" it up enought so its understandable
 
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BrittanyGulden

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Wait this almost seems to good to be true. If attaching a wide focus IR laser onto a filtered camera is so easy, than why does the Military use IIT's? The "main purpose" of IIT' is to "amplify." WHy would the Military go about using IIT's when they could just use the IR laser & filtered camera as they woudln't require any amplification?

I assume it may have to do with, "I see you, and you cant see me. Wait oh sh*t, you can see me"

Distance may come into play?

Wait, IR uses "natural light" whether it be starlight or moonlight correct? I think I just answered my question, what if its a cloudy night? You're screwed than.

..yup, just answered it lol
 

Ablaze

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Not so fast. I'm tired just now and can't respond to everything you said, but I suggest you read this.
 

Ablaze

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Ok, so as I'm sure you have read by now, IR is a type of light, not a property of light. (I'm using the term "light" here loosely).

Most modern digital cameras can see some range of IR, but IR refers to a wide range of the EM spectrum, so an IR laser at 1064nm (a common value) might still be invisible to most cameras. Many people say that anything over 700nm is IR, but 808nm light can be produced by green lasers sometimes and is still dimly visible to humans. It is my understanding that most animals cannot see as far into the red and infra-red spectrum as humans can though.. so perhaps 808nm is completely invisible to foxes.

I must state, once again, that IR lasers may be invisible but they can still cause extreme eye damage.

Your typical remote control will be visible on a camera's LCD screen. According to this wikipedia page remotes typically transmit at around 940nm. I would look for a laser that can be focused and emits approximately that wavelength.

I would be extremely wary about focusing an IR laser without laser safety glasses and a controlled environment. I suggest you read this thread.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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Ok, so as I'm sure you have read by now, IR is a type of light, not a property of light. (I'm using the term "light" here loosely).

YES, UNDERSTOOD.

Most modern digital cameras can see some range of IR, but IR refers to a wide range of the EM spectrum, so an IR laser at 1064nm (a common value) might still be invisible to most cameras. Many people say that anything over 700nm is IR, but 808nm light can be produced by green lasers sometimes and is still dimly visible to humans. It is my understanding that most animals cannot see as far into the red and infra-red spectrum as humans can though.. so perhaps 808nm is completely invisible to foxes.

I UNDERSTAND THE WHOLE "REMOVE IR OR LEAVE IR" DILEMA. I JUST CAME ACROSS A VIDEO THAT SAID I HAVE 2 OPTIONS: 1 BEING EITHER USE AN "OLDCSHOOL" CAMERA FROM THE 90'S OR USE A "NEWER" DIGITAL CAMERA AND REMOVE THE IR FILTER. THE NEWER CAMERAS HAVE IR FILTERS BUILT IN AND THE OLDER ONES FROM THE 90'S DONT.

PEOPLE WHO ARE POSTING "HOW TO MAKE NIGHT VISION USING IR" NEED TO START NOTING ON THIS, BECAUSE IT CONFUSES PEOPLE WHEN SOME VIDEO'S/TUTORIALS SAY "REMOVE FILTER" AND OTHERS SAY "JUST LEAVE IT IN."


I must state, once again, that IR lasers may be invisible but they can still cause extreme eye damage.

I CARE MORE ABOUT PROTECTION THAT ANYTHING, TRUST ME: I ONLY HAVE 2 EYES.

Your typical remote control will be visible on a camera's LCD screen. According to this wikipedia page remotes typically transmit at around 940nm. I would look for a laser that can be focused and emits approximately that wavelength.

WHY TRY TO FIND A LASER THAT EMITS AT YOUR SPECIFIED (940nm) WAVELENGTH? JUST BECAUSE SAFETY? NOTE: I WILL BE USING SAFETY GLASSES & THIS INSTRUMENT WILL BE ONLY USED ON MY PRIVATE PROPERTY. BACK ON THE WAVELENGTH, WHY DID YOU RECOMEND 940? IS IT JUST BECAUSE SAFETY OR IS THERE MORE TO IT?

I would be extremely wary about focusing an IR laser without laser safety glasses and a controlled environment. I suggest you read this thread.
I AM HEADING TO THE "EYE DOCTOR" ON MONDAY TO DISCUSS THIS. I WILL CLICK ON THE LINK AS SOON AS I FINISH THIS. HOWEVER, I WILL BE USING SAFETY GLASSES REGARDLESS.



UNDERSTOOD. CAPS ARE MINE^

THANKYOU FOR HELPING ME OUT!:thanks:


ALSO, SO "THERMAL" AND "IR" ARE THE ONLY WAYS TO ACHIEVE NIGHTVSION? BOTH THERMAL AND IR USE THE DIFFERENT PORTIONS OF THE IR SPECTRUM, THERMAL BEING THE UPPER PORTION AND IR BEING THE LOWER, CORRECT?


I HAVE BEEN LOOKING AROUND FOR A PART OF THE FORUM WHERE IT GOES OVER LASER DIODE DISTANCES AND HAVN'T CAME ACROSS A THREAD THAT EXPLAINS IT? I JUST ASSUME THE MORE "NM" THE FARTHER IT WILL BEAM? I KNOW BROAD, I AM SURE THERE ARE A LOT MORE FACTORS THAT COME INTO PLAY.
 
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Ablaze

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The nm of the laser indicates the color it produces.
 
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