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How come 500.1nm is so expensive?

Hap

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Hey guys,

Another question which came back into my mind. How come 500.1nm is so expensive? I took a quick swing over to LaserGlow & saw they offered a 1mW labby for $7,000 :wtf: :wtf:

How come it's so expensive? Why not just use a 1mW 650nm pointer instead?

Thank you for taking the time to explain :)

-Alex
 

Grix

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It's expensive because it's an extremely high tech laser which costs a lot to research and manufacture. The target customers are obviously not hobbyists who would use the laser to point around, but scientists or other people who need such a specific wavelength for whatever purpose and have the funds to pay for it.
 
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Hap

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It's expensive because it's an extremely high tech laser which costs a lot to research and manufacture. The target customers are obviously not hobbyists who would use the laser to point around, but scientists or other people who need such a specific wavelength for whatever purpose and have the funds to pay for it.
Makes more sense to me now, thank you Grix for taking your time to answer my question! :)

-Alex
 

ARG

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Certain applications require a very specific wavelength of laser. 650nm doesn't work for all laser applications.
 

Hap

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Certain applications require a very specific wavelength of laser. 650nm doesn't work for all laser applications.
Thanks ARG for responding also!

Do anyone of you guys know what 500.1nm would even be used in? What kind of application?

Thanks!

-Alex
 

Hap

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I'm guessing for some kind of spectroscopy.
Ok, awesome. Thank you! :)

I do have a final question if you don't mind answering? I see that 500.1nm is a DPSS laser.

Is this how 500.1nm light is created?

808nm----->1000nm----->500.1nm

-Alex
 

ru124t

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I believe it is used in a Gem Raman and Photoluminescence Spectrometer. These are not your basic gem identifying Ramen but rather a new high tech version that is small and portable. With this you can tell if any gem has been fooled with and tell if it is natural or tampered with. Usually it detects if diamonds have had their flaws filled to make them seem flawless or jade has been dyed to give darker color. They can also be used to identify if gems are real based on their spectrum absorption. I am not an expert on this but I believe they use 500nm , 532nm and 405 (445) to do this.
 

Sigurthr

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Yep, it's a Raman Spectroscopy line. When doing Raman work you need a variety of wavelengths available, as you typically need to either blue-shift or red-shift your diagnostic wavelength to achieve usable raman spectra from the sample, while avoiding natural fluorescences in the sample which would swamp out the raman spectra with the fluorescent continuum produced.

It's expensive because it is a low gain line from an uncommon crystal setup that uses rare mirror coatings, all set up to be lab-grade stable in all terms of output.
 

ZRaffleticket

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Where have you heard 500.1nm? Thats a nitrogen line... I had to google that one.

As far as DPSS systems go there is a YAG process at around 500.8nm. (1064+946 SFG)

I'm not aware of any DPSS system running at 500.1nm unless you direct double a diode or play with tunable systems.
 

Hap

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Where have you heard 500.1nm? Thats a nitrogen line... I had to google that one.

As far as DPSS systems go there is a YAG process at around 500.8nm. (1064+946 SFG)

I'm not aware of any DPSS system running at 500.1nm unless you direct double a diode or play with tunable systems.
I mean 500.8nm yes, I just realized this sorry! :(

-Alex
 




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