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Found this diode inside a printer

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I was taking apart an old Lexmark printer at school and found this diode. Since the diode is from a printer, its probably <1mw, but this diode has a lot of heat sinking for such a low power. This makes me curious and wanting to power it. Any thoughts?
 

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Well first you're need a spec sheet to know what WL it is. This determines the right connections and voltage to run at from a REGULATED source. It could be a 780nm or some other ir.
 
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I tried looking up the numbers on the board in search of a datasheet. I couldn't find any but I may try driving it at a low current anyway.
 

Hap

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Maybe if you found the specific model of the printer you could get a spec sheet showing the type of diode used? :)

-Alex
 

DTR

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It is probably fairly high power and I am pretty sure they use IR diodes. Would have to be fairly strong as they are used to rapidly dry the ink after it is sprayed on the paper.
 

diachi

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It is probably fairly high power and I am pretty sure they use IR diodes. Would have to be fairly strong as they are used to rapidly dry the ink after it is sprayed on the paper.
That's not how a laser printer works... :p They do use IR though, at least the modern ones do. Usually around the 750nm or so mark.

Edit: Diagram:

 
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DTR

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Interesting. I always thought the laser was used for the fusing/drying process but looks like that is done by a separate heating element.
 

diachi

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Interesting. I always thought the laser was used for the fusing/drying process but looks like that is done by a separate heating element.

Yep, laser discharges the negatively charged drum to create an image, negatively charged toner sticks to those discharged (slightly positive actually) areas on the drum. Paper is positively charged by the printer, then as it passes by the drum the negatively charged toner is transferred from the drum to the positively charged paper.

Then the paper is fed through the fuser, which is really just a hot roller/laminator. Toner is melted/fused onto the paper and voila! The inner workings of printers were a part of my IT course way back when I got into IT.

So the power is usually fairly low too, shouldn't be more than a few 10s of mWs IIRC. :beer:
 
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RB astro

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Here in Australia our Laser Printers actually just burn the image directly onto the paper.
No need for toner.
So check where it's made.

:crackup:
 
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Thanks for the replies. I never knew that some printers charge the toner to create an image on paper. Although I do not know much about this particular diode, I am open to anybody's suggestions on how to power it.
 




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