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Eye injury from lasers

up2u

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Hello,

I am completely aware that you must wear goggles at all times when using lasers with high powers, Which i do at all times, But im still not completely sure how bad it can be to do several things with your laser.

For example if you point a 1.2w Blue laser at a White wall, And your standing 2 Meters away from it while looking at the dot for 3-4 seconds Max.
Will this cause permanent injury's?

Ofcourse if you point your laser at a wall and have your head 30CM away from the dot your done but i suppose its acceptable from some meters away if you dont stare at it for to long.

Correct?
 

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Depends on surface quality, and angle. If its glossy, and the angle hits you in the face, then yes, you can get some damage.
 

snoutke

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Glad to see that you are back after the suspension, TJ ;)

For example if you point a 1.2w Blue laser at a White wall, And your standing 2 Meters away from it while looking at the dot for 3-4 seconds Max.
Will this cause permanent injury's?
Most probably not. But the most important thing is to use common sense.
 
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up2u

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Glad to see that you are back after the suspension, TJ ;)



Most probably not. But the most important thing is to use common sense.
Yes thats true but im like for example.

I obviously dont have 5 Goggles over here, And i have to show off my laser to others you know ^^

So if i can safely just show the beam from some distance then That would be cool.
 
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Yes thats true but im like for example.

I obviously dont have 5 Goggles over here, And i have to show off my laser to others you know ^^

So if i can safely just show the beam from some distance then That would be cool.
Tsteele just had a review on some 7$ a piece goggles that look sharp and wear well that are perfect for what you want. I had the same concerns and bought 3 pairs so I can show it off without worrying about random reflections.
 
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danefex

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No no you shouldn't test this under any circumstances. Regardless of how close you're standing to a reflective surface in a matter of feet or meters, there's no 'absolute' data that defines staring at the dot is okay for X seconds when you're a certain distance too close. YOU ARE CONSTANTLY damaging your eyesight when you expose your retinas & optic nerves to such an intense reflection at any given close range. One major problem is that you won't notice the damage for awhile & after doing this several times. Just use common sense & know that blue light intensity takes a heavy toll on your eyesight with unprotected, prolonged use at close ranges in meters. Even if you never take a beamshot or direct hit to your eyes, the reflection from a 1W+ laser is damn near as dangerous as doing just that over a given amount of time absorbing reflected light. Take care of your eyes, they're the only ones you've got. :beer:
 
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up2u

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No no you shouldn't test this under any circumstances. Regardless of how close you're standing to a reflective surface in a matter of feet or meters, there's no 'absolute' data that defines staring at the dot is okay for X seconds when you're a certain distance too close. YOU ARE CONSTANTLY damaging your eyesight when you expose your retinas & optic nerves to such an intense reflection at any given close range. One major problem is that you won't notice the damage for awhile & after doing this several times. Just use common sense & know that blue light intensity takes a heavy toll on your eyesight with unprotected, prolonged use at close ranges in meters. Even if you never take a beamshot or direct hit to your eyes, the reflection from a 1W+ laser is damn near as dangerous as doing just that over a given amount of time absorbing reflected light. Take care of your eyes, they're the only ones you've got. :beer:
Thank you, This helped.

And where can i find those 7$ Goggles? Seems interesting.
 

danefex

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You're welcome. Knowing and respecting the dangers that come with a 1W laser is important - makes the difference between intelligent, enjoyable responsible use vs learning braille ;)

EDIT: no idea on $7 goggles, maybe Digital or TS will share that info
 
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up2u

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You're welcome. Knowing and respecting the dangers that come with a 1W laser is important - makes the difference between intelligent, enjoyable responsible use vs learning braille ;)
LOL ill take the first one.
 

ZRTMWA

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Hello,
For example if you point a 1.2w Blue laser at a White wall, And your standing 2 Meters away from it while looking at the dot for 3-4 seconds Max.
Will this cause permanent injury's?

Correct?
Depend's on your definition of injury. I would say yes though. I did some stupid shit like this and I have way more floaters than I used to. Not really an injury but still annoying and preventable.
 

DrSid

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You can safely show it to people by pointing in the sky. And maybe pointing at distant hill, or house. But then you are putting on the other end of the beam at risk. You must know there won't be any people or planes there. Also the beam will be visible to whole city, not just your friends.
Still 'safely' would usually mean 'if you can prevent accidents' .. which you can't. So better get one more pair of goggles and let the friends take turns, that's how I do it.
 
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Wolfman29

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Just a minor correction to DrSid - the beam will only be visible to people within a small distance of the beam, actually. Intensity of the beam drops off just as fast, and because it's not very intense to begin with, many won't see it. I would suppose that, if you are perpendicular to the beam, you would have to be well within 20 meters of the beam at the closest point to be able to see it. If you are more parallel, I would suggest that it would be easier to see, but not many people besides yourself are going to be parallel with the beam.
 




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