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Effects of 445 nm laser on common things.(pic heavy)

NRGLite

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EDIT: Decided not to add that much pics. Enjoy the post!
As the wavelength of 445 nm lasers are close to UV, fluorescent materials glow with an unearthly light once they are shone upon. Of course 405 violet lasers fairly brush the ultraviolet range, so if anyone could show some pics of violet lasers affecting things that would be awesome :wave:!

The following is a picture of my brother's Lego minifigure with some fluorescent blocks under light:


Now the same model is shown in darkness under the glow of my 1W laser diffused at the ceiling:

Notice how in this blurry image the greenish glow of the Legos shine out so conspicuously. Bringing a finger close to a glowing orb produces a faint hue of green upon one's finger; proving that it really does glow. Bringing the beam close causes it to fairly shine.

A random photo is next showing a few fluorescent pieces of Lego. There is an orange fluorescent block in the foreground and a phosphorescent skull in the background. The orange block does not fluoresce as dramatically as the green ones, most likely because we cannot see red-orange as well as we see green. The skull is not charged.


The next is a video about the effects of 445 nm lasers upon certain materials. Unlike what the camera caught, the reflection of the laser as it hit the floor is really a lighter shade of blue. This is due to the fact that certain ultraviolet sensitive paint or varnish was used upon the floor, causing it to reflect a different shade of blue. A phosphorescent star is also in the background.
http://laserpointerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45917&stc=1&d=1408481463

Phosphorescence
As seen in the video above, the star is charged by the heavily diffused laser. Different wavelengths farther away from the ultraviolet range will render the phosphorescent material harder and harder to charge, to the point that green and red lasers cannot have an effect upon the material at all. The following is a video of three phosphorescent Lego minifigures being charged. In real life, the figures do not suddenly brighten up; it is the camera's effect.
http://laserpointerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45918&stc=1&d=1408481608
More videos coming soon! :D
MORE STUFF
As some have said that 445 nm lasers do not fluoresce, here are a few pictures:

That is done on tile. No fluorescence is shown.

This one, however, shows a lighter blue upon the wooden floor. The pictures do not give it justice: It's like owning a 473.
And a picture of the dot; because why not!

Hope you enjoyed that!
 

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NRGLite

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You know, starlight, I am going to add more but not a lot more so I'll edit that out:)
Any thoughts on the post? :beer:
 

TheDukeAnumber1

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Unlike what the camera caught, the reflection of the laser as it hit the floor is really a lighter shade of blue. This is due to the fact that certain ultraviolet sensitive paint or varnish was used upon the floor, causing it to reflect a different shade of blue.
I'm calling BS. Someone varnished your carpet that happens to fluoresce a different shade of blue because it's UV sensitive? BTW your not even using a UV laser, your clearly making things up.

Neg-
 
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Eudaimonium

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Quite possible for a UV laser to appear blue on some materials.

Try shining it on a sheet of paper intended for printing, it appears as if it's a 473nm (or somewhere around there) laser spot, instead of normal deep violet.

No need for all the hostility toward one member, guys. He's trying.
 

grainde

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Since when did we start picking on people who may have misinterpreted something? The neg reps seem to be flying here and as far as I can tell for no real reason. So many people on here post things that are incorrect, but they are generally pointed in the right direction...

By the looks of it your carpet is just reflecting the light. Fluorescence is when light is absorbed and directly reemitted at a longer wavelength, determined by the stokes shift (due to vibrational relaxation and wave overlap of the vibrational modes between the two electronically excited states). Phosphorescence is where a material absorbs a photon, but the excited electron undergoes intersystem crossing resulting in a forbidden transition to the ground state. This means that the electron takes time to relax back (as its theoretically not allowed) and the emission of a photon takes much longer. This is found for example in GITD materials. :beer:

Edit: Just saw your post Eudaimonium :beer:
 
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starlight

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You know, starlight, I am going to add more but not a lot more so I'll edit that out:)
Any thoughts on the post? :beer:
My thoughts are they are cool pictures and more would have been nice. I really like the glow on the toy in the first picture been thinking of stuff to try this on
 
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ChaosLord

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There are a few threads around about 405nm/445nm laser and fluorescence/phosphoresence. As soon as I got a low powered 405nm pointer, I ran around laseing everything. 405nm works about as good as a blacklight. I found out that peanut butter is fluorescent.

My avatar is a 445nm laser hitting a light bulb in an acrylic cube filled with phosphorescent material. It glows blue after being charged, and a 405nm laser charges it up the best.
 

Hap

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The next is a video about the effects of 445 nm lasers upon certain materials. Unlike what the camera caught, the reflection of the laser as it hit the floor is really a lighter shade of blue. This is due to the fact that certain ultraviolet sensitive paint or varnish was used upon the floor, causing it to reflect a different shade of blue.
First off, really cool idea NRG. I gave you some + rep since I saw you were in the deep red(and no im not talking about IR :p)

Secondly, I don't think your carpet needs special "varnishing" to change how a wavelength looks. I oftenly point my 473 at my "natural" carpet and it appears much, much um.... clearer and lighter blue(I would say 488nm even thought have never seen it but am only saying this based on pictures).

Finally, keep up the pictures you have some good talent and we could always use more pictures on LPF :)

-Alex
 

TheDukeAnumber1

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@ Eudaimonium & grainde

In my case it's a pet peeve of mine when someone provides an explanation for something as if they are facts when they are really just assumptions.
This is due to the fact that certain ultraviolet sensitive paint or varnish was used upon the floor, causing it to reflect a different shade of blue.
@ NRGLite

Your pics are fine and not everything you said was wrong. Stick around, learn a bit, stay safe, and your rep will bounce back quickly.
 
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Eudaimonium

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In my case it's a pet peeve of mine when someone provides an explanation for something as if they are facts when they are really just assumptions.
There are nicer ways to correct somebody's false information, you know.

I have noticed a very odd and irritating trend on LPF, it's when somebody who's in negative reputation posts literally anything, nearly everybody just pick on details simply to shun him, push his rep farther into red, and generally bully around.

Attitude towards somebody should NOT be determined by their reputation.

I have a feeling you would NOT have this exact reply toward somebody who has your or mine level of reputation/post count.

I have not seen this kind of reputation bias anywhere else, and I understand why majority of the forums do not actually have any kind of reputation system (or at least one that can go negative).

On a lighter note...
ChaosLord said:
As soon as I got a low powered 405nm pointer, I ran around laseing everything.
Man, I definitely know how THAT goes :D Suddenly every little odd thing around your room/house is first checked to see if it glows funny under deep violet light :D
 
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TheDukeAnumber1

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There are nicer ways to correct somebody's false information, you know.
It's not the false information I was concerned with it's obviously ok to not know everything, but taking assumptions and stating them as facts I do have a problem with. Simply subbing "This is due to the fact that" for "I think that" would have not drawn a neg from me.

I have a feeling you would NOT have this exact reply toward somebody who has your or mine level of reputation/post count.
It's a shame that you think I would be that bias but I guess we might never know since I've yet to see any one with our "level" of rep or post count do this.

In the end it doesn't matter, we both have seen new members stick around and go from red to green very quickly. As fast as we will neg new members I think we are equally as forgiving.
 

Eudaimonium

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In the end it doesn't matter, we both have seen new members stick around and go from red to green very quickly. As fast as we will neg new members I think we are equally as forgiving.
That is true, and this community is very friendly and forgiving, it's just that I kind of point out the small things keeping it from being perfect in my eyes. [pet peeve of mine, heh]

And this is just one of those times. In any event, here's hoping he sticks around, learns some new things, gets accepted :beer: Like a lot of other members :gh:
 

NRGLite

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Sorry I'm late for the conversation:san:
Thanks for all the kind replies guys. I've been battered around for a bit because of some really bad decisions :scowl:( inability to click the search button?:whistle:). But I will learn.:eek: (Special thanks to eudamonium! +rep!:p)
Sorry, but don't 445 nm lasers cause things to fluoresce because they are close to the ultraviolet spectrum?:thinking: I mean, all my highlighter pens are shining.
And to everyone: I will get better pictures of the fluorescence of the wall. It really looks sky-blue.

@grainde: :thinking: Hehe.. figuring that one out...:p

Peanut butter? :wtf: So an evil genius eating a perfectly normal peanut butter sandwich under a black light chews down on glowing fat? :drool:

[:yabbmad::yabbmad::yabbmad: What's with spam on my thread?)

So bottom line-- I will bounce back. And I will also shine a lighter wavelength while doing so. :san:
 

Atomicrox

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FYI - pretty much all materials fluoresce with 445nm and I don't think I've ever found a material that does not fluoresce with 405nm.

This is obvious with 405nm but harder to detect with 445nm, because it's lm/W rate is higher and the ratio of reflected/fluorescent light is also higher.

On some materials the effect is strong enough to completely change the color of the dot (try pointing at plants - most of them glow red) or make it lighter (very noticeable on white clothes). On most materials the effect isn't strong enough to visibly alter the dot color, but you can still verify it by looking at the dot with a diffraction grating or high OD laser goggles - with the grating the first order diffraction will look like a comet, with a bright blue dot followed by a light-blue-to-green-to-red tail - with goggles the dot will usually look yellowish or orange, which is what's left of the "comet's tail" after the filtering effect of the goggles.

One cool thing to notice is that the reflected light will have those interference "speckles" because it's coherent light, while the fluorescent light will be plain and boring.
 




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