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Driver for 9mm 445nm?




USAbro

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Never used it but aren't the 9mm diodes about 1.6-3.5 watt. I think that driver would do fine with the amperage draw.
 

crazyspaz

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I feel like I have seen that in a thread somewhere here...regardless, I would at the very least test it on a simulated load before popping it onto a diode. Do you have an oscilloscope or know someone who does? If its a clean output with no major spike on startup, then it would be a nice driver to have for cheap :)

Oh, keep in mind its a 5 mode driver. I know there is some way to disable said modes, but I couldnt tell you how.
 
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USAbro

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@Crazyspaz is right. You probably want to test it before wiring it up to your $80 diode..........Unless you like a bright flash......and smoke.
 

rhd

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@Crazyspaz is right. You probably want to test it before wiring it up to your $80 diode..........Unless you like a bright flash......and smoke.

I can't see it killing your diode, but it might under power it.

You don't really know if it's constant current. Just because FT varied the input voltage and saw a constant output current, doesn't mean the output current is constant. It might be constant voltage, but still keep the current constant in the test they ran because the load voltage was consistent throughout.

Regardless, the reason I don't see it killing your diode is that the current never peaked above 2.2V in their testing, and that's factoring in a load voltage drop of an LED like an XML (somewhere around 3.5V). You're going to have a larger voltage drop with a 445 9mm, so in all likelihood, that driver will provide a low output current. A simple guestimate would be (2.2 x (3.5/5)) = ~1.55 A.

That's making a bunch of assumptions as to how it will react to varying voltage drops - but it would be my "best guess". Of course you will definitely want to test it on a test load before connecting a valuable diode.
 

USAbro

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That's true too, personally, I'd test it either way, even if I was pretty sure, just not worth the cost of replacing the diode. I could get Chipotle for lunch 10 times with that amount of money. But testing it is up to the OP. He might not have access to an oscilloscope.
Good luck!
 

10fenny

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Chipotle ten times?! That's the first thing you come up with. Hehe Awesome. Anyways...
As a newb I have little knowledge to offer, yet that does seem very cheap for that spectrum. As a mechanic I have access to a vehicle scanner that has leads for a lab scope! I am wondering if this would be a good way to test that driver for voltage and amperage consistency.
 
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The Lightning Stalker

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Sight unseen, I would say no. A real
"electronics grade" oscilloscope has a fast
response time to catch brief transients,
something not essential in a scanner.
 

10fenny

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I have only used an oscilloscope very briefly in highschool. But can you freeze-frame and check in milliseconds on one?
I checked search and kept getting side tracked sorry if this has been asked.
 




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