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Dense Fog = Laser Fun!

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Anyone in England tonight will notice the dense fog, about 15 meter visibility where I am, which is a sign for some lasering fun! ;D

No pictures until tomorrow, they are on my camera which is rather pointless putting them onto my laptop when I have a better gaming computer to put them on :p

Anyways, after trying my Viper 75 and seeing it left a solid beam but the fog was so dense it didn't actually get that far, and watching the people across the street staring in amazement. I decided to get out my 50mw module I got from dragon lasers, set it up at the window and powered it up... Well... Wowzers is all I can say. My whole street and area must have been staring up mesmerized! For 10 mins there was a nice solid, thick, beam pointing towards the clouds. I actually heard my neighbor shout out 'wow!' and saw the guy watching across the street run inside trying to get everyone to watch haha.

I will try my 100mw red scanner soon, not sure how well it will come out though. Shame I havent got the green laser in there yet, its supposed to be a RGY scanner but as there is only a red laser in there its only doing half patterns...


Pics on their way! Anyone else in England, get some pics and post them!
 

FireMyLaser

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Wish that I was there... I love laserbeams!!! If only my 100mw green was still working :'(
 
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andy_con said:
yes very thick in essex
Tried my scanner, could only see one effect from my angle and thats the first on the random mode. Scattering hundreds of beams everywhere. Im not actually sure the red laser in my scanner is 100mw... But still, some amazing effects out there tonight.
 

Razako

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Does anyone know if shining a powerful laser through snow could be unsafe for the eyes? I am dying to try it with my more powerful lasers but it seems like the beam might hit a snowflake and get scattered back into my face.
 

roSSco

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I can't imagine that there is any way a snow flake could reflect enough to damage your eyes. ;)
 

Benm

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It's pretty foggy here in holland as well tonight, visibility around 50 meters. I pointed some lasers skyward, still one of the coolest things to do with them ;) I guess it must scare the people around here, since i live in a tall buildings and these 'experiments' are quite visible.

Didnt take any pictures though, as it is pretty cold here (just above freezing) and i didnt feel like setting anything up.

Does anyone know if shining a high power laser through snow could be unsafe for the eyes? I am dying to try it with my more powerful lasers but it seems like the beam might hit a snowflake and get scattered back into my face.
I guess the risk is quite limited if 'high power' means (a few) 100 mW or so. Snowflakes usually scatter rather than reflect, and even if they do reflect right back into your face this will be for the shortest period of time since they fall and twirl by.
 
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Razako said:
Does anyone know if shining a powerful laser through snow could be unsafe for the eyes? I am dying to try it with my more powerful lasers but it seems like the beam might hit a snowflake and get scattered back into my face.
Not so sure about reflecting back into your eyes, that would be very unlucky. I would be more concerned about the fact snow flakes are white, you would probably be seeing green blobs in your eyes for the next 10 mins after.

Would be interesting to see if a higher powered one could actually melt the snow as it falls though.
 

Razako

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Thanks for the answers. Last week I pointed my pulsar and aries-35 out of my window into the sky on a snowy night and it was spectacular to say the least.

Still not sure I want to try it with my rpl. Those would be some blindingly bright snowflakes O_O
 

Benm

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It does look quite spectacular indeed, even if you only have a little bit of snow you suddenly see them light up all over the beam.

As for blindingly bright: Snowflakes arent much whiter than common paper, so pointing at one with a laser is as dangerous as pointing at a piece of paper at the same distance. I'm sure this may be quite uncomfortable at night using a few 100 mW green, but not blinding in the literal sense.

You could experience some spots in your vision afterwards, but that is normal. Anyone who worked with the green monochrome screens back in the day knows the world looked pretty pink for about 5 mins after use ;) This works also on smaller area's only, resulting in temporary spots.
 
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Ok, only managed to get one half decent picture. It was through double glazed glass which acted like a beam splitter...
 

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andy_con

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lamborgini8 said:
[quote author=andy_con link=1203376031/0#2 date=1203377146]yes very thick in essex
Tried my scanner, could only see one effect from my angle and thats the first on the random mode. Scattering hundreds of beams everywhere. Im not actually sure the red laser in my scanner is 100mw... But still, some amazing effects out there tonight.[/quote]

im going to be making a 600mw red module soon if your interested you can have first dibs on it mate.
 

Benm

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Ok, only managed to get one half decent picture. It was through double glazed glass which acted like a beam splitter...
Nice one... shows very well how the beam seems to just stop dead somewhere in the sky. This effect always amazed me a bit, the endpoint looks so well defined it's almost an extra-large lightsaber ;)
 

Switch

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It's probably because it appears to thin because it's so far away, but in fact it's too fat to be bright enough for your eyes to pick it up that far away.Besides, if it actually stopped at a very long distance(10 miles I guess is a good example) or if it continued another 100 miles you still wouldn't be able to tell the difference as it would probably appear just a tiny bit longer.

Eighter that or it reached the end of the universe OR got sucked into a black hole :p
 




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