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Can this somehow be used to measure laser power?

SMIDSY

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I saw this on DX and as far as Im aware power meters use either heat or light emitted to gauge thwe power.

so; can this be some how used to measure the power?

http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.5100

thoughts people?
 

climbak

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

It could probably be used, but you would have to use a laser or three of known power to calibrate it. Most likely you would also need to use some kind of attenuator so that the reading doesnt just go off the scale for higher powered lasers.
 

bobobob121

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

yup, and im sure there is some kind of formula out there to figure out Lux to mW ;D after all, there's a formula for everything now adays. lol
 

SMIDSY

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

If anyone finds out let me know LOL this coudl be a solution to the expensive laser meters...
 

MB500

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

At the least it could be the next step up from the led method.
 

FireMyLaser

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

The LED-meter is cheaper. :p

Can't compete with that.
 

SMIDSY

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

led meter? confused :-?
 

hutch123

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Re: Can this somehow be used to measure laser powe

Per wikipedia (search for Lux - I'd post the link, but I can't yet), it is possible to convert between lux and mW. However, it's not just a simple formula:

"The lux is one lumen/meter2, and the corresponding radiometric unit, which measures irradiance, is the watt/meter2. There is no single conversion factor between lux and watt/meter2; there is a different conversion factor for every wavelength, and it is not possible to make a conversion unless one knows the spectral composition of the light.

The peak of the luminosity function is at 555 nm (green); the eye is more sensitive to light of this wavelength than any other. For monochromatic light of this wavelength, the irradiance needed to make one lumen is minimum, at 1.464 mW/m2; one obtains 683.002 lux per W/m2 (or lumens per watt). Other wavelengths of visible light produce fewer lumens per watt. The luminosity function falls to zero for wavelengths outside the visible spectrum."


So, theoretically it could be done, but it would require some experimentation and calibration to work. Since we are dealing with monochromatic coherent light, it should be less complex than for broad spectrum light.
 




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