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Anyone worried about their Li-ion batteries now?

Razako

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Exploding e-cigarette injures woman, destroys car

People keep getting injured, or having their property damaged by exploding E-cig batteries. The scary part is that these are the same batteries we use in many of our lasers and flashlights. Am I the only one who's getting worried about this?
 

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nah we should not.... E-cig are on a whole new level compare to Laser. E cig draw 20-50 amp so lol....laser user is no where close to that current draw.
 

Rico2

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Personally I keep my batteries away from my lasers until I'm getting ready to use them, then immediately remove them when I'm done. Unless they explode during use, I'm cutting out all extra opportunities for them to fail.
 

Razako

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Personally I keep my batteries away from my lasers until I'm getting ready to use them, then immediately remove them when I'm done. Unless they explode during use, I'm cutting out all extra opportunities for them to fail.
Well I'm just getting worried because I'll usually keep them in some of my lasers, and then keep those lasers in cabinets or in boxes. I also keep them in my general use flashlights which are scattered throughout the house. How common is it for these batteries to have a catastrophic failure when not in use?
 
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These batteries we use are likely the most dangerous batteries (chemically). The protection circuits are nice though. You should already be using a charging bag. If you are not... get one. They are less than 20.00. I'd recommend removing your batteries after usage. Place the batteries back into their plastic cases. If you don't have a plastic case for each battery, or for a pair, get some. Keep batteries in a cool, dry place. I recommend an old metal ammo can or toolbox. Do all of this and you should be safe. Also never buy cheap batteries with "fire" or "fest" in their names.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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Generally speaking not worried at all.

Mainly two reasons;
-Use known brand batteries.
-Use specific batteries for specific applications.

Almost without exception lithium battery explosions can be traced back to catastrophic user error. Usually, using a crappy battery, OR pushing that battery to far past it's design specifications, like using an INR battery rated for max 1-2A discharge, and trying to draw 20A from it. Or worse yet, an XXXXfire battery.

In this case it was unregulated, mechanical mod. As a vaper, I personally don't feel comfortable using any batteries that aren't rated to at least 20A discharge, preferably 30A.

Of course anytime you store power, there's risk involved, but the fact remains that there are literally BILLIONS of lithium battery powered devices out there, and very statistically insignificant accidents.

The danger lies with using crap batteries, crap chargers, and last, user error.

Vaping seems to be on the news forefront because of how hard it pushes the batteries... use a calculator... Ohm's law | Steam Engine | free vaping calculators You'll see at say .25 resistance, 3.7v, 75W, you're asking well over 20A of draw from your battery.

Want to reduce risk? Use a known brand battery, designed for high discharge, like 25r's for example, bought from a known company, and use a regulated box mod. At this point there is really no good reason for someone who vapes, to continue to use a mech mod.
 

LEDbeam

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These batteries we use are likely the most dangerous batteries (chemically). The protection circuits are nice though. You should already be using a charging bag. If you are not... get one. They are less than 20.00. I'd recommend removing your batteries after usage. Place the batteries back into their plastic cases. If you don't have a plastic case for each battery, or for a pair, get some. Keep batteries in a cool, dry place. I recommend an old metal ammo can or toolbox. Do all of this and you should be safe. Also never buy cheap batteries with "fire" or "fest" in their names.
NOW you tell me! I just bought some with "fest" in the name about 10 minutes ago. My first purchase.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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The reason to avoid "fest" or "fire" batteries is that there are so many knock offs, and just rewrapped old batteries, coming from china. That said, genuine ultrafire, and efest batteries aren't really any worse than from any other brand. The important thing is to know that their source is good... which RMM, I think is.
 

LEDbeam

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The reason to avoid "fest" or "fire" batteries is that there are so many knock offs, and just rewrapped old batteries, coming from china. That said, genuine ultrafire, and efest batteries aren't really any worse than from any other brand. The important thing is to know that their source is good... which RMM, I think is.
What is RMM? I bought my efest batteries from Mtnelectronics.
 

DTR

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This hits me on two fronts as I like lasers and I like to vape. A lot of the stories I have seen of "exploding e-cig batteries" are not from the e-cig but from people putting them in their pockets without being in protection cases. Shorting on keys, loose change or other metal objects causing them to vent. Like this guy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1LjSuq0rk8

Other reports are usually issues with bad chargers overcharging or people building unregulated devices not really knowing what they are doing and drawing much more current at a rate the cells were not meant to discharge. I would guess there are few to no reports of a decent quality VV/VW mod venting a cell.

It is mostly reported that way to make E-cigs look bad without acknowledging they are the same batteries in used in a lot of common electronics. To me it is like when people throw 9V primaries in a drawer and they short causing a fire then saying we have an exploding smoke dector battery problem and calling to make smoke dectors safer. It is a Li-ion safety issue.
 

Benm

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I would not worry about the 'not in use' situation that much.

Those e-cigs explode when in use or charging, or perhaps when you accidentily press the button whilst in your pocket. They don't randomly explode when sitting on a table untouched.

Another cause might be these 'mods' where people replace the vaporizing coil with one that has less resistance and hence delivers more power, while the battery and/or circuitry was not designed to handle it. If, for example the stock model has a 1 ohm coil and 5 amp rated battery, all is fine. But if you replace that coil with a 0.25 ohm type you'll be demanding more than double of what the battery was rated for, giving it every 'right' to malfunction or explode at that point.
 

J4K3ST3R

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My arctic has got an 18650 it in, as well as my fenix pd35
One being a Sanyo and one an efest. Doesn't bother me a bit
But don't mind me. I'll let you know when said accident happens
 




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