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a few infrared pics

brucemir

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Here are a few pics trying to capture infrared light, first using an 808nm 1000mw laser (purchased from Gismo's laser sale) in my garage with my black curtains set up and in total darkness, and then a quick shot outside using natural infrared light. For all three of these shots I had to use a Hoya D72 Infrared filter for my camera. This filter blocks out all visible light and only lets the infrared light in. When you look thru the camera with the filter on you cannot see anything. It is a procedure to take infrared pics as I had to play around with the white balance (custom setting outside) on my camera, figure out exposure times, compose and manually focus with the filter off, and then very carefully screw in the filter without moving the focus ring. The first laser pic was a 10 minute exposure at f8 iso 125, and the second one was at 15 minutes f8. I also used a matrix diffraction gratings to create many invisible beams, and eliminate the chance of starting a fire, as this laser does burn black things very quickly, especially with the beam focused on one spot for so long. The laser had no problems being on that long and being so cold in the garage the laser was cool even after 15 mins. I did change the battery for each shot. The room was pitch black. and I could barely see the dots,and even with the IR filter on. I did get a few images that actually illuminated my mirror set up (for use later with my other lasers that night) with only IR light, The pics do have a good amount of noise in them. If I do this again I will try ISO 50 .Anyway it was an experiment and I am sure I will check it out again one day. It was a lot of work, but thats how you learn!
The last pics was taken outdoors with the IR filter on and was exposed at 1 minute f13 iso 125. It was cloudy with the sun peeking thru. When the image is viewed after taking it shows up as all red. Digital infrared photography requires post production work in photoshop playing with the different channels and layers. This was my first attempt and the picture is in focus, exposed well, and the weird lighting of IR light is apparent. I am really looking foward to the warm weather, as the best time to do IR photography is when there is green leaves, lawn, as the greens will turn white. When I was much younger in the pre digital days, I used to shoot Kodak IR film, color and black and white. Back then different color filters gave you different color schemes in color, and a red filter for B/W film gave that ghostly effect. A lot of words for only three pictures!








 

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Proves what we can't see is also a beauty. However I'm glad where I live doesn't look like that last picture because it looks like it was taken on Mars or something gloomy with all the infrared!
 

trencheel303

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Nice, Bruce. Find out what your camera's native sensor ISO is and run it on that. Running it on ISO 50 might not yield you less noise (possibly more, or a "mushy" image) and will just cause you to wait longer for the shot!
 

brucemir

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Het Trencheel ,
I will have to look into it. I will let you know when I find out. I use ISO 125 for all of my laser photography and am kind of locked into that setting as it serves my needs well
 

brucemir

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trenceel -found out the base ISO for my Nikon d5200 is ISO 100. I guess I will move it to that from my usual 125 as my new standard. thanks !

Just remembered - these photos were taken as JPG,s. The correct format to use is RAW files and convert to JPG,s after photo editing. The next time I do this it will be in the correct type of file.

Blarg King, you should get a filter! Go to Google and put in infrared photography and you can see what's involved and see some peoples really beautiful weird IR photography. You will need a good photo editing program too.
 

GR3EN

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Very nice as usual. As always something new when you post pictures. A delight as always.
 

KapHn8d

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Very cool!

I love IR photography, but honestly haven't done much of it recently. The only laser IR I've done was when I was testing the IR blocking filter that was allegedly installed on my 473nm handheld back when I first bought it. Clicky HERE.

I also have done some field work with Infrared... examples HERE and HERE demonstrating an IR converted body versus a (different) non-IR body with a Hoya R72 respectively.

Keep up this IR tinkering... I'm really looking forward to seeing more from you, buddy!

Cheers,
Clayton
 

brucemir

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Hi Clayton,
Here in NJ the snow is just starting to go away. Once everything starts to turn green again I have plans to do quite a bit of outdoor IR photography. I already have many landscape scenes I plan to shoot. I took a few outdoor pics when I got the Hoya D72 filter back in Feb. and the results were pretty good so I am going to pursue it. AS I stated in the post, when I was much younger I would shoot Kodak Color and B&W IR film with various colored filters. The laser shots here were using a 1W 808nm laser. It is not powerful enough to do what I would like as far as photographing it is concerned. A while back Smeerworst sent my a pic he took using a 4W IR laser (forgot the frequency) and fan diffraction grating that came out excellent. I could not open your first pic but the second one is real nice. And the 473nm stuff is very interesting.Any way in a few months I will hopefully add to this thread with some new pics. Have a good one!
 

Sigurthr

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Zykkor makes a few very good yet inexpensive IRpass filters; 850nm and 950nm. Their 720nm (Hoya d72 knock off) passes a lot of visible light though and should be avoided.

Since you're using a camera which retains the internal cut filter hot mirror that blocks most IR and all UV you have to use long exposures which cause the sensor to heat, generating noise. See if your camera has a noise reduction setting. My Oly E-PM1 does, it takes the shot as requested, then takes an equal shot with shutter closed, and subtracts hot pixels from the normal shot using the closed shutter shot as a reference. Works beautifully

I recently posted a thread about IR (and UV) photography in the "other" section, feel free to check it out if you're interested.

I've yet to try manipulating any images in software, other than crop/rotate/resize. Do you have any suggestions for free software that lets you manipulate the color channels of a RAW image to get that kinda awesome landscape shot like you posted? I've just been shooting in B&W like the old film days, haha.
 
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Sigurthr

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I'd used GIMP a few years back, but never really got the hang of it. Unintuitive is a perfect description. I'll check out paint.net, thanks!
 




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