Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

5mW 532nm Module Microphotography

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Hi everyone,

after some time of inactivity in Multimedia forum due to busy time at work I've eventually had some extra free hours to steal for myself and focus at a somewhat different area. Recently I've started to experiment more with macrophotography up to a certain extend, testing my amateur skills on various still inorganic objects. Curiosity and testing my own photographing equipment limits were the two main driving factors that led me to more laser related" stuff".

Finally, after browsing through lpf.com history articles/threads, I came to a conclusion to have a closer look at a laser diode as is. Now, fully aware of the fact there were some truly great contributions in the past by members like Blord, piferal, Leodahsan, Smeerworst, pullbangdead and others (forgive me if I don't list any of you good members who had their act on this subject), I knew it'll be nothing new/groundbreaking to come up with.
Perhaps not too far is the following thread from ryansoh3 from recent past as well:

http://laserpointerforums.com/f48/macro-shots-ebay-greenie-modules-83530.html

lazereer's shown what I'm about to present in the coming gallery as well:

http://laserpointerforums.com/f52/quick-pictorial-review-super-beast-green-100-006-a-60094.html#post851234

So as an object of my testing a module was used while violently extracted:gun: from the following laser pointer which died on me:

$8.54 5mW 532nm Stars Light Show Green Laser Pen - 3-mode laser effects at FastTech - Worldwide Free Shipping


Before I reveal the gallery, confession's to be made: I pretty much destroyed everything except of the depicted module. Pliers don't do any good, do they:whistle:. I've literally brutally removed the module with the driver board still attached together, but then cut the wires from between them. The driver part was so wrecked it would be a nightmare to look at. I apology sincerely to all of you, dear laser enthusiasts:can:.

Also, since I'm not very much familiar with the technicalities and proper terminology details, if there's an incorrect part on my side, any comments from other more advanced users are welcome:beer:.
Each picture carries a short information/description. No measurements were done during the testing, call me lazy, but quite frankly I was busy enough with the actual photography process which can be divided in two sessions:

1) The in-the-field photography process. This involved using 35mm Nikon DX lens with Raynox DCR-250 magnifying lens and 3x Kenko teleconverter, eventually my 18-55mm Nikon DX zoomable lens in same combo. The true microphotography however started after I've applied Optika brand microscope with 4x - 10x - 40x - 100x magnification. For practical reasons only 4x and 10x magnification came to play, due to inside ambient light limitations and microscopes characteristics it was actually desirable. An appropriate t2 adapter and specifically designed lens adapter for microscopic operation were fitted on the Nikon D5200 DSLR. Manual mode possible only.
Steady hand, IR remote control and tons of patience were with me for several hours in total:).

2) Post-processing. Normally I don't participate in retouching my pictures, but in this case is was a must. thanks to a good man piferal, I applied Zerene Stacker software on nearly all object samples. This technique requires a lot of patience and was actually much more time consuming and tiresome:tired: then the 1st stage. Still I'm no pro:eek:.


Let's get to it!


Module with the battery. The only two survivors "after the extraction action" (And a laser cap as a memento:D, not depicted here).


Disassembly. Nearly real life size.


Module parts side view.


Alternative raw view.


"Brass (body) cake with a (plastic) glass lens top".


"Brass (body) cake" without the expanding lens. 808nm IR diode with GLM.


Collimating convex lens. Comes as a front part of the outer brass body in which the 808nm IR diode with a glued crystal in brass holder are located.


Expanding glass double concave lens.


Back section of the 808nm IR diode.


Front section of the 808nm IR diode.


GLM up view. The glued crystal which consists of Nd:YVO4 crystal and KTP crystal surrounded by white silicone(?) set within the brass body.


GLM bottom view.



Microscopic photography


4x magnification. GLM crystal bottom view.


100% crop.


versus

10x magnification.


40x magnification. Corner focus.


100x magnification. Corner focus.


4x magnification. GLM crystal top view.


100% crop.


versus

10x magnification.



808nm IR (pump) diode


Do you find me pretty:eek:


100% crop.


versus 10x magnification.


100% crop.


Side view.


Another side view.


100% crop.


Different angle, side top oriented.


Different angle, side bottom oriented.


against





Back section diode area with pins. 10x magnification.


Back section diode pin detail. 10x magnification.


Front bottom section diode area. 10x magnification.


Front bottom section diode pin detail.


The long wires detail. 10x magnification.


versus



Double convex plastic glass lens centre detail. 4x magnification.




:thanks: for reading & watching, comments are appreciated!
 

BowtieGuy

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
5,306
Likes
1,819
Points
113
I see you're out making laser p**n again. There is just something about those naked diodes! :D
Seriously though, the microscopic photos are super. Nice work, thanks for sharing with us. :beer:

Recognition when the system allows. :(
 
Last edited:

IsaacT

New member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
5,908
Likes
418
Points
0
This is great! I love it. Gotta go to work, but +3 when I can!
 

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Glad you like the microscopic gallery, gentlemen:beer:. Since this was my 1st attempt getting in on the ground floor, I'm sure there's still much to improve eventually. Normally I wouldn't label myself as a patient person, but photography in combination with laser hobby brings me some sort of inner piece/relaxation. And if at least a partially useful presentation or information is achieved during the session, couldn't wish for more:).

Perhaps two more shots of GLM's bottom section crystal taken under a slight angle can be added here.

4x magnification.


10x magnification.
 

brucemir

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 3, 2012
Messages
1,189
Likes
895
Points
113
Hey Gismo,
It is very good you are expanding your photographic endeavors into macro / micro photography. I am sure you will keep on finding very small things to make very detailed and large. What is the lens that you are saving up for? I too find that very detailed photography can be relaxing, and the more you put into it, the more rewarding the results. Keep on going!
 

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Well Bruce, it's challenging, but so far I enjoy carefully scratching the surface of miniature world of laser diodes (and not only them:)). The specific lens I'm trying to save for is Nikon Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G Micro, originally for full-frame DSLR cameras, but should work fine on DX type (which D5200 is) as well. That's my goal for the end of this month, so it is.

I'd like to "picturize" other diode types, perhaps 638nm Mitsubishi would be a nice candidate (if it hasn't been done by other member(s) before:thinking:).

Thanks for the words of encouragement:beer:.
 
Last edited:

IsaacT

New member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
5,908
Likes
418
Points
0
That lens is awesome. On a DX body you will be able to use it but since there is a crop factor of 1.5x in the APS-C sensors, you will not have it get as close for the same focus as you would on a full frame.
 

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Just a minor diode picture update. Still playing with the Zerene Stacker software while having the diode lying around, I've used 160 stack shots in total to achieve (hopefully) slightly clearer/sharper image under 35W halogen lightning from a distance of 30cm.

10x magnification.


100% crop.
 

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Lotus_Darkrose: cheers, man:). I'm starting to be bored a bit with this diode, so I've ordered an open can Mitsubishi 660nm type from Odicforce (UK based company), would like to get some detail out of it:D.

It'd be nice for sure to make some sort of a picture based catalogue that sums up all the commercial available diodes used widely in the forum out there. Well, at least the cheap ones (for a start). Will see how that goes...
 

brucemir

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 3, 2012
Messages
1,189
Likes
895
Points
113
Hey Gismo,
More nice macro work. I really like the detail (silver/gray) in the foreground in the first pic. Have you got the we lens yet? I just got my new battery grip for the 5200. Will send you a pm about it later
 

gismo

Active member
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
902
Likes
213
Points
43
Thank you for another comment, Bruce:beer:.

Still saving for it, waiting anxiously for the last week of the month for money boost. However in the meantime I could start to benefit from using the 105mm micro lens, borrowed temporarily from the buddy who sold me his D5200 I can currently use (good man himself). One call clearly tell the difference! This heavier and bigger lens is absolutely ideal for 1:1 shots, very decent for portrait as well. Can't wait to get my hands on it:wave:.
 
Last edited:

Polonium210

Active member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Messages
400
Likes
44
Points
28
Those are some beautiful photos!!

The only way I have been able to take macro shots is by turning my 18-55 lens backwards but it takes some tricky lighting and an incredibly steady hand.

Nice work!
 

IsaacT

New member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
5,908
Likes
418
Points
0
Those are some beautiful photos!!

The only way I have been able to take macro shots is by turning my 18-55 lens backwards but it takes some tricky lighting and an incredibly steady hand.

Nice work!
Do you just hold the lens in front of the mount? That seems very hard lol. :wtf:
 




Top