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445 pinout with V5 flex drive

midias

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I was wondering what you do with the case pin on the V5 flexdrive on the 445nm diode. I am thinking it goes to the neg on the battery according to the flexdrive manual but I have found conflicting info on the forum. Looking on the flex board the neg drive side is connected to the neg battery so it might not matter but I thought I would ask. Any ideas?
 



kingdave2357

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You do NOT use the case pin on your 445nm diode, that is why it is clipped, you solder the +pin to the +lead of the flex and then -pin to the -lead of the flex.....
All this info is already here, just look for it;)
 

midias

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kingdave2357

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Oh, huh. I never read that thread before. I didnt do any of that, I just hooked the +pin to the +output of the flex and the -pin to the -output of the flex and did the same for the battery. I have had no problems with any of my diodes or builds so far.
 

Flaminpyro

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If you are using a V5 flex drive you can connect the No.2 or ground pin of the laser diode to either the positive or the negative output of the driver. It depends on if you have a negatine or positive ground host, and that is determined by which way you put the battery in !
in most all cases it's a negative ground and you would connect the No.2 LD pin to the ground or negative side of the V5 flex drive output.
Hope this helps ;)
 

Wallydraigle

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Oh, huh. I never read that thread before. I didnt do any of that, I just hooked the +pin to the +output of the flex and the -pin to the -output of the flex and did the same for the battery. I have had no problems with any of my diodes or builds so far.
I was a little confused by that post too. Does anyone know why he connected the clipped pin to the solder joint like that?
 

BShanahan14rulz

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the pin isn't electrically connected to the diode chip inside the can. When you press-fit it into a heatsink, the heatsink is electrically connected to the can of the diode and as a result, also it is connected to the case pin that is not otherwise used. Since most hosts use the metal to create a path to the - of the battery, you can use this pin as if it were the - connection to the battery (or switch, if you don't want your laser on all the time) because it is electrically continuous to the heatsink, which is electrically continuous to the metal body of the host.
 

Wallydraigle

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But if you're hooking the - pin to the - output on the driver anyway, why would you do anything with the little pin?
 

BShanahan14rulz

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The case pin of a case-isolated diode (like many blurays and, from what I read, 445's) is electrically isolated from both the + and - of the diode. That doesn't mean that it's isolated from the battery once you've installed the diode and heatsink into a battery-operated host.

Edit
Basically, instead of connecting the - to the body of the host, or running a wire down to the - of the battery, you connect to the case pin of the diode, which is press-fit into a metal module, which should be in a metal heatsink, which is normally electrically continuous with the body of the host. The body of the host is normally used as a path to the - of the battery.
 
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Wallydraigle

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Okay, I got it. It's just an easy way of getting back to negative on the battery.
 




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