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3D image in midair at last !? Adding 3rd dimension to laser scanner !

DrSid

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Sorry if it's being re-posted.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNoOiXkXmYQ

Looks pretty basic so far, but pretty legit. Colors could be impossible to achieve, but it's a start ..
 

rhd

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What kind of power is needed.... and how can we reproduce this?
 

Svenvbins

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Very cool indeed. I'm sure I've seen the same tech (different video, but same shapes & technology, probably the same people too) quite some time ago - if not years ago. I wonder what they have changed, because tbh I don't see much different with what I saw back then.

As for power, I know another group at my uni did some plasma/laser stuff too and I think it was around 10W CW (and then doing pulsed, of course), but I might as well be completely off.
I do wonder how they change the Z-location of the image. X&Y are done with the scanners, but you'd have to shift your focus along the beam. That, and you'd want a very sharp focus which seems quite difficult to achieve over 2 m.

Interesting, interesting!
 
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blasterman

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I can see this being really cool for high end concerts or theaters. Multiple projectors could create a very large and randomized starfield above the stage that would be pretty amazing.

Also looks like a pretty good ozone generator, which could be good and bad.
 

DrSid

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What kind of power is needed.... and how can we reproduce this?
They vaguely mention 'kilowatt IR laser'.

What I find nice is how precisely they can control the focus point. I would expect this to use several beams, which would intersect in one spot. But this seems to be single beam. You don't need to precisely align individual beams like this.
I guess it uses large aperture, so the focused part of the beam is very short. This would also make beam width at focus point smaller. Ionization requires quite a power density. Also I thought you usually use UV lasers for that. Very interesting.
 
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Shadowsix

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Very cool! Definitly will lead to open air planetarium type shows amongst many other possibilities!

:drool:
 

Atomicrox

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Pretty nice. Seems similar to air ionizing with SSY1 lasers.
I wonder how safe it is...
 




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