Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

1W 445nm vs 2W 808nm


Prototype

New member
Joined
Jun 19, 2009
Messages
2,712
Likes
121
Points
0
That's an invisible diode, it will show up as maybe a few mW of red, like a keychain laser, but it's going to be incredibly powerful and dangerous, and you'll need special and expensive goggles for IR protection.
 

H4xS4w

New member
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
5
Likes
0
Points
0
I appreciate the response, but I was looking more for an answer as to which has the higher burning capability. Its clear which one has a higher output, but from what Ive read so far, the wavelength also affects the burning capability...please correct me if I'm wrong.

Thank you!
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2010
Messages
708
Likes
23
Points
0
yes you are right, the lower end of the electro-magnetic spectrum has more photons meaning better burning capabilities, but because of the gap in power (~1W) the wavelength wouldn't really be taken into consideration... the 2W IR laser would still burn better than 1W of 445.

stuart :)
 

daguin

New member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
16,636
Likes
622
Points
0
yes you are right, the lower end of the electro-magnetic spectrum has more photons meaning better burning capabilities, but because of the gap in power (~1W) the wavelength wouldn't really be taken into consideration... the 2W IR laser would still burn better than 1W of 445.

stuart :)
. . . . . . **IF** they have similar collimation and focus.

Peace,
dave
 

RA_pierce

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 16, 2007
Messages
3,399
Likes
378
Points
83
yes you are right, the lower end of the electro-magnetic spectrum has more photons meaning better burning capabilities, but because of the gap in power (~1W) the wavelength wouldn't really be taken into consideration... the 2W IR laser would still burn better than 1W of 445.

stuart :)
1mW = 1mW regardless of wavelength.
I don't know why the myth still exists.

Most important for burning:

1. Material type
2. Power
3. Power density
4. Absorption (color of object)
5. Wavelength (color of laser)

Edit: My >900mW 445 can set fire to twigs, cardboard, and wood chopsticks if done correctly. My >2W 808 will ignite paper, cotton, candles, etc. nearly instantaneously... even though the beam specs on the 445nm are much better. One thousand more milliWatts goes a long way.
 
Last edited:

DJNY

New member
Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
5,995
Likes
415
Points
0
If you´re interested, "drlava" is selling his focusable 1,2W 808nm IR laser
 

H4xS4w

New member
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
5
Likes
0
Points
0
Most important for burning:

1. Material type - To burn, or the laser diode?
2. Power - For clarification, mW, right?
3. Power density - Not sure what you mean by this...
4. Absorption (color of object)
5. Wavelength (color of laser)

Thank you!
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2010
Messages
708
Likes
23
Points
0
3. Power density is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) distributed over a given unit area perpendicular to the direction of travel. Power density is expressed in watts per square meter (W/m² ) or milliwatts per square centimeter (mW/cm²). Correct me if im wrong.

stuart :)
 

RA_pierce

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 16, 2007
Messages
3,399
Likes
378
Points
83
Most important for burning:

1. Material type - To burn, or the laser diode?
2. Power - For clarification, mW, right?
3. Power density - Not sure what you mean by this...
4. Absorption (color of object)
5. Wavelength (color of laser)

Thank you!
By material type, I mean the object you want to burn. Obviously, metals and rock will be difficult to destroy. Wood and plastics will be much easier.

Power is measured in Watts (W), and in lower power lasers, milliWatts (mW).

Power density is measured in W/cm^2.
What it means is how much power is crammed into the given area.
So, the smaller the point of light is, the higher the power density will be. This is the reason we like lasers with small beam diameters, low divergence, and that are focusable. Higher power density means higher visibility and more burning power. Focusing a laser forces all the photons in a beam of light to converge on a single point. The concept is the same as using a magnifying glass in the sun to burn things.
 

H4xS4w

New member
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
5
Likes
0
Points
0
Ah! Ok! Thank you!

Are there methods of focusing convergence and minimizing the diameter of a factory bought laser?

If so, would you be able to point me to any resources for further info?
 

chipdouglas

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2008
Messages
4,011
Likes
190
Points
63
no offense man. but i don't think you are ready for a burning laser. you should do a lot more reading. especially on safety. I think you should start with a weak PHR blu-ray burner. 90mw or so. then you can get a true understanding for the power of a 1watt and higher laser.

michael
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2010
Messages
708
Likes
23
Points
0
^^ agreed, you will thank chipdouglas later when you still have your vision and know how to safely operate a laser this powerful... these are not toys.

stuart :)
 

H4xS4w

New member
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
5
Likes
0
Points
0
None taken, and I completely understand. Which is why I'm here!

I have already purchased the Arctic (order # 52,XXX), but have absolutely NO intention of using it anytime soon. Having a special room built out in my basement specifically for this which will take another week at minimum. (I can already see the cringes on peoples faces, but I'm not an irresponsible/immature person, have been handling high powered rifles and pistols all my life, therfore do possess a reasonable understanding of safety, caution, and attention to detail.)

So, in addition to my previous question regarding the possibilities of focusing factory lasers, my next question is the reliability of the LaserShades provided by WL.

I've read several topics that indicate both their adequacies as well as inadequacies, so I'm a bit confused. The Arctic produces a beam in the wavelength of 445nm, but the LaserShades supplied are labeled as 532nm. While my logic tells me that lenses rated for a higher wavelength shoudl be sufficient for lower wavelengths as well, I'd rather not leave the safety of my eyes to a guess or mere chance. So my question:

1. Are the LaserShades sufficient protection against the Arctic?
2. If not, would anyone be able to make recommendations? (Obviously, with my vision at stake, price isn't TOO much of a concern, but I'd rather not overpay if possible.)

Thank you all for your help and guidance!
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2010
Messages
708
Likes
23
Points
0




Top