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10 mw blue laser from lazershopuk ebay review

antaean3000

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I brought a blue 10 mw laser from lazershopuk he sells them for around 100 on ebay.
I got mine today and when you shine the laser beam near it is very bright and is blue but the further away you shine it the bigger the beam gets and then the light from the laser is very dull.

From what i gather there is some kind of filter or lens on it that makes the beam wide for weaken it.
It also makes your eyes go funny looking at it when shone on wall which was quite a way away.

Personaly if i had the choice to buy again i would buy a green laser instead of this blue one.

I have ordered a green 5mw laser for £10 again i dont know if its going to be bad or not but only time will tell.

I certainly would not buy any blue lasers from ebay. I think they just buy replacment lasers for ps3's or other blueray players and take the laser out from it and turn then in to laser pointers.

Just put it this way this blue laser was not as good as my very first red laser i paid top price for when they first came out.
 

MarioMaster

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you mean you bought a blu-ray laser pointer, blue is 473nm DPSS like green, and much more expensive
 

daguin

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First, you are talking 100 POUNDS, not American dollars, correct?

Second, your blu-ray is acting very normal. 405nm is right at the edge of our ability to perceive it. Search this forum for info about the 405nm spot and beam. Th perceived "brightness" of the light is VERY dependent on what you shine it on. Experiment around a bit. You will be very saurprised how bright it is when you hit a surface that reacts to 405nm

If you are looking for visibility, go with the green. If you are looking for a really cool color that will cause things to fluoresce, you've got it in your hand.

Peace,
dave
 

sk8er4514

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and also the beam is focused to a certain distance, it is normal for it to expand to be bigger at farther distances (or shorter distances). this doesn't mean the laser is bad.

and you should definitely get some GLOW IN THE DARK materials, the 405nm lights them up really bright and has some cool effects!

there is probably a lens in there that you could adjust if you took it apart, but i dont know what it looks like and you should probably not do this.
 

Milos

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This guy is so expensive. Its NOT 100 dollars. It over $200 ! He sells some of them for $385 too. I question his lasers. They do look pretty, but nobody knows who builds them and the seller certainly is not.

I wish I could make something that looks as nice- like that laser ( CNI style) I garanty it would work better :)
 

antaean3000

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It was 100gbp i paid for mine. You can order such cases online somewhere like the ones used in the lasers for sale on ebay. Then you would just need to buy a laser diode but thats just going by what i have read on other websites.

I like the colour of the laser. just dont feel safe using it. It just was one of those split second choices i made to perchase this laser before the auction ended. I do not like red lasers but i wanted a green one and did a search only to find a blue one and since i never seen a blue laser before i wanted to get one.

I should invest in some safty glasses for any lasers i buy. I have a green one coming i am going to keep that but i still want to be safe.Where in the uk could i get good protective eye ware?
 

Milos

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yes, you paid 100 British pounds for it. Thats $197.1698 right now. Wow British pound went down..
 

MarioMaster

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i wouldn't worry too much about 10mw, heck i use my 40mw green inside all the time, you just gotta be a little more weary of what you shine it on
 

Chicxulub

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unless you catch it straight in the eye, you'll be fine with your 10mw laser, reflections won't hurt you from that thing.

If you shine it on things like paper or a white t-shirt, it should turn a VERY bright blue, and if you put it on various other objects, it will turn a very bright red, orange, yellow or green. I personally can not wait to get mine!!!
 

daguin

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quadcam said:
unless you catch it straight in the eye, you'll be fine with your 10mw laser, reflections won't hurt you from that thing.
You're going to have to help me with this statement. Are you saying that if I shine my laser at a mirror and it hits me in the eye, it is effectively less dangerous than being caught straight in the eye just because it is a reflection?

I will grant you that the reflected light from something like cement or brick or paint won't cause damage (unless you're close and/or the laser is fairly powerful). The rough, irregular surface will disorganize and diffuse the light. However, a reflection from something like a mirror, a crystal face, glass, chrome, etc. will arrive virtually unaltered from the source. It seems to me that the reflection from one of those types of surfaces from "that thing" is still going to be 10mW of laser light "straight in the eye."

If your statement is correct, then we don't need goggles. We just need to be careful where we point our lasers because reflections won't hurt us.

I enjoy my blu-rays probably more than most because of my surroundings, but I use eye protection even in my office, because I am surrounded by shiny, highly reflective crystal faces and these are the only set of eyes I'm going to get!

Peace,
dave
 

Razako

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daguin said:
[quote author=quadcam link=1209851594/0#8 date=1209933534]unless you catch it straight in the eye, you'll be fine with your 10mw laser, reflections won't hurt you from that thing.
You're going to have to help me with this statement. Are you saying that if I shine my laser at a mirror and it hits me in the eye, it is effectively less dangerous than being caught straight in the eye just because it is a reflection?

I will grant you that the reflected light from something like cement or brick or paint won't cause damage (unless you're close and/or the laser is fairly powerful). The rough, irregular surface will disorganize and diffuse the light. However, a reflection from something like a mirror, a crystal face, glass, chrome, etc. will arrive virtually unaltered from the source. It seems to me that the reflection from one of those types of surfaces from "that thing" is still going to be 10mW of laser light "straight in the eye."

If your statement is correct, then we don't need goggles. We just need to be careful where we point our lasers because reflections won't hurt us.

I enjoy my blu-rays probably more than most because of my surroundings, but I use eye protection even in my office, because I am surrounded by shiny, highly reflective crystal faces and these are the only set of eyes I'm going to get!

Peace,
dave[/quote]
A reflection off crystal isn't that bad because it will be scattered and a good amount of the light will pass through the crystal. Shine an ordinary 5mw green through a row of wine glasses and you will see my point. The initial reflection is <1mw and completely harmless. Usually a standard glass surface will reflect 5-20% of the light back at you and it will be semi-scattered and harmless by the time it reaches you. As long as the laser is <30 and you aren't near any actual mirrors or chrome you don't need to worry too much about reflections.

You need goggles for extremely high outputs like 100+mw because you can hurt your eyes by even looking at the dot on a plain surface at close range. I play around with a 10ish mw blu-ray all of the time and I haven't hurt my eyes with it. Using eye protection with a blu-ray tends to ruin all of the cool blue and green fluorescence effects.

Just use common sense with lasers and you should be fine.
Using eye protection all of the time whenever using lasers above 5mw isn't practical and you won't have much fun.
Never using eye protection even when burning stuff or shining the laser at mirrors is a great way to lose an eye.
It all depends on the situation.
 

daguin

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Razako said:
However, a reflection from something like a mirror, a crystal face, glass, chrome, etc. will arrive virtually unaltered from the source. It seems to me that the reflection from one of those types of surfaces from "that thing" is still going to be 10mW of laser light "straight in the eye."

I enjoy my blu-rays probably more than most because of my surroundings, but I use eye protection even in my office, because I am surrounded by shiny, highly reflective crystal faces and these are the only set of eyes I'm going to get!


A reflection off crystal isn't that bad because it will be scattered and a good amount of the light will pass through the crystal. Shine an ordinary 5mw green through a row of wine glasses and you will see my point. The initial reflection is <1mw and completely harmless. Usually a standard glass surface will reflect 5-20% of the light back at you and it will be semi-scattered and harmless by the time it reaches you. As long as the laser is <30 and you aren't near any actual mirrors or chrome you don't need to worry too much about reflections.

You need goggles for extremely high outputs like 100+mw because you can hurt your eyes by even looking at the dot on a plain surface at close range. I play around with a 10ish mw blu-ray all of the time and I haven't hurt my eyes with it. Using eye protection with a blu-ray tends to ruin all of the cool blue and green fluorescence effects.

Just use common sense with lasers and you should be fine.
Using eye protection all of the time whenever using lasers above 5mw isn't practical and you won't have much fun.
Never using eye protection even when burning stuff or shining the laser at mirrors is a great way to lose an eye.
It all depends on the situation.
I'm sorry. I wasn't clear with the statement. I said "A" crystal face. I assumed you were familiar with some of my postings. I will grant that there will be very little reflection from crystal "stemware". My office, however, is filled with "crystals" (Amythest, quartz, tourmaline, aquamarine, morganite, etc.) as well as about 100 highly polished mineral spheres. Trust me. Laser light bounces around in this room like a carnival funhouse :eek:

Part of my reason for replying to your post was the general statement that "reflections" would not be as bad as being hit straight in the eye. IMHO that is setting a neophyte (which that poster was) up for potential harm. As a person walks around a home or neighborhood, there are many of the types of reflective surfaces that would reflect unaltered laser light. I teach college which exposes me to thousands of young people. Believe me, common sense isn't all that common.

Peace,
dave
 

MarioMaster

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i think the word for today is specular reflections

watch out for those

diffuse reflections pose no thread
 

Chicxulub

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daguin said:
[quote author=Razako link=1209851594/0#10 date=1209943793] However, a reflection from something like a mirror, a crystal face, glass, chrome, etc. will arrive virtually unaltered from the source. It seems to me that the reflection from one of those types of surfaces from "that thing" is still going to be 10mW of laser light "straight in the eye."

I enjoy my blu-rays probably more than most because of my surroundings, but I use eye protection even in my office, because I am surrounded by shiny, highly reflective crystal faces and these are the only set of eyes I'm going to get!


A reflection off crystal isn't that bad because it will be scattered and a good amount of the light will pass through the crystal. Shine an ordinary 5mw green through a row of wine glasses and you will see my point. The initial reflection is <1mw and completely harmless. Usually a standard glass surface will reflect 5-20% of the light back at you and it will be semi-scattered and harmless by the time it reaches you. As long as the laser is <30 and you aren't near any actual mirrors or chrome you don't need to worry too much about reflections.

You need goggles for extremely high outputs like 100+mw because you can hurt your eyes by even looking at the dot on a plain surface at close range. I play around with a 10ish mw blu-ray all of the time and I haven't hurt my eyes with it. Using eye protection with a blu-ray tends to ruin all of the cool blue and green fluorescence effects.

Just use common sense with lasers and you should be fine.
Using eye protection all of the time whenever using lasers above 5mw isn't practical and you won't have much fun.
Never using eye protection even when burning stuff or shining the laser at mirrors is a great way to lose an eye.
It all depends on the situation.
I'm sorry. I wasn't clear with the statement. I said "A" crystal face. I assumed you were familiar with some of my postings. I will grant that there will be very little reflection from crystal "stemware". My office, however, is filled with "crystals" (Amythest, quartz, tourmaline, aquamarine, morganite, etc.) as well as about 100 highly polished mineral spheres. Trust me. Laser light bounces around in this room like a carnival funhouse :eek:

Part of my reason for replying to your post was the general statement that "reflections" would not be as bad as being hit straight in the eye. IMHO that is setting a neophyte (which that poster was) up for potential harm. As a person walks around a home or neighborhood, there are many of the types of reflective surfaces that would reflect unaltered laser light. I teach college which exposes me to thousands of young people. Believe me, common sense isn't all that common.

Peace,
dave

[/quote]

I simply made the error of thinking it was.
 




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